SCAU’s recently proposed stadium in paris will disappear under a luxuriant vegetation


the stadium's mirrored screen-printed glass surface emits reflections of the events or the environment, allowing visitors to see fragments of landscape, sports matches or the sky.

The post SCAU’s recently proposed stadium in paris will disappear under a luxuriant vegetation appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

PiM.studio’s visitor center for sevenoaks natural reserve in kent acts as an ecosystem


maximizing the use of natural materials will play a key role in creating a low maintenance building able to live in harmony with the nature.

The post PiM.studio’s visitor center for sevenoaks natural reserve in kent acts as an ecosystem appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Redefining imitation materials, Jorge Penadés restructures leather

In Frame 122, we look at surfaces and materials that are not what they seem: from Kengo Kuma’s hardwood veneers to Onno Adriaanse’s foam shelving.
 

tudor style.. really?! time traveling architects reck havoc on modern icons


architects from bygone eras, rise from the dead only to redesign their favorite modern works in another era's style its a architectural trading places

The post tudor style.. really?! time traveling architects reck havoc on modern icons appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Collaborative city

Madrid has a creative spirit at play, fuelled by artists, designers and architects looking for a more collaborative way to live and work
 

Showhouse clubhouse: Reinventing the showroom

Architecture and interior design studio Area-17 rethinks social spaces for the new Iris Ceramica and FMG Fabbrica Marmi e Graniti showroom.
 

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

WowHaus
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

At first glance you might think this 1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London is something of a time capsule. It isn’t, but plenty of originality is still in place decades on.

You will find it in Shirley and specifically on Orchard Rise, described as ‘one of the most sought-after roads in this residential area’. I don’t know the area, so I’ll have to take the agent’s word on that. If you know any different, do let me know.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

It is quite a remarkable place too. As I said, it does look like a house lost in time when you see the exterior and when you see some of the inner details too. We moan all too often about people ripping out period details and replacing them with bland modern finishes. This is an example of just why that tends to be a bad idea.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

It isn’t perfect and some rooms could probably be reworked. But we are talking tweaks. This house has so much going for it and so much period character from the front door onwards. Yes, that door with ‘Solstice’ emblazoned on it is the original one.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

Also original are the kitchen units, the Crittall metal windows, the handrail on the stairs, recesses in the walls for display, a fireplace or two and some door handles. Details to be treasured. Oh and this is also quite a sizeable house too with plenty of garden, which is pretty much the cherry on top.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

The accommodation on the ground floor starts with the entrance hall and goes on to include the kitchen with those original units (though some have been replaced), a dining room and the living room.

Hold on to that original handrail and take yourself upstairs to the first floor with four bedrooms, a WC and the family bathroom. The main bedroom also features those display recesses in the wall, a wonderful fireplace and what the agent calls a ‘playful use’ of differing ceiling heights.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

That’s not quite all as more stairs take you up to the roof terrace, which has been recently resurfaced and offers views of some distance, right up to Canary Wharf. Its original use was for the architect owner to watch the stars, so if you have a love of space, you can always follow in his footsteps.

As we said, plenty of garden too, mainly lawn with a variety of beds and shrubs, as well as a small playhouse built by architect Gubby for his children. Around a third of an acre all told. Finally there is a double garage and a short drive for more parking space.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

If this is your dream home it is just up for sale for £845,000.

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

The post 1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London appeared first on WowHaus.

 

Want to Ride This New Metro? You’ll Need to Show Your ID

Urumqi. (Photo by User:Ccyber5 via wikimedia commons)

Our weekly “New Starts” roundup of new and newsworthy transportation developments worldwide.

Riders Will Need to Show ID to Ride the First Metro in Xinjiang Region

Metro systems are supposed to help people get around their cities quickly. But when this purpose collides with a government’s desire to clamp down on a restive populace, what happens then?

You could probably guess the answer to that question. And that’s what’s happening in the Xinjiang region of northwest China, where the government is fighting separatist agitation on the part of its Uighur population. An Associated Press news report in The Washington Post states that the Xinjiang regional legislature passed a bill that will require riders of the new metro line in Urumqui, the regional capital, to show identification when purchasing tickets.

China’s official Xinhua News Agency reported that the bill requiring ID to ride the Urumqi metro passed this past Sunday. Riders without valid tickets or who use others’ IDs to purchase them face fines of up to 200 yuan ($32 U.S.)

The Uighurs are Turkic Muslims, and the government has been trying to stamp out a separatist movement among them, sending thousands into detention camps and political re-education centers. Several issues have fueled the movement, including Islamist extremism, resentment over Chinese immigration to the area, tight controls on religious and cultural observances and growing economic inequality. Uighur and human-rights activists say the government crackdown on the Uighurs unfairly targets all of the region’s 10 million Uighurs.

The Urumqi metro is slated to enter service later this year.

Cebu Picks Team to Build Light Metro Line

Cebu, the oldest city in and first capital of the Philippines, will join Manila in the ranks of cities with rapid transit systems. The SunStar Cebu reports that a consortium of Chinese and Singaporean companies will build and run a new light rail subway-elevated system to serve the 2.8 million residents of the city and its surrounding province.

The consortium includes units of China’s Guangzhou Metro organization, Chinese environmental protection and hydropower companies, SIngapore’s Harvest Global Investment company and a Filipino partner, Sinophile Sheng Yun Management Inc.

Funds for the system’s construction will be provided under the Chinese government’s One Belt One Road investment program. The new light metro system will have two lines: a north-south Central Line that will run in a subway through Cebu City’s central business district and on an elevated structure outside it, and a line connecting the city center to Cebu’s airport on neighboring Macatan Island.

Engineer Manuel “Jam” Jamonir, the business development manager for Udenna Infrastructure Corp., told the SunStar that the line would be built at no cost to the Philippine government and that its operation would not require government subsidies.

The Philippines Department of Transportation still needs to sign off on the documents authorizing construction of the system; its backers expect this to happen by the end of the year. Once this happens, construction should begin in 2019, and the system should be ready for service by early 2022.

The light metro is the first phase of a two-phase plan to improve mass transit on Cebu. The second phase, a commuter rail line, will be implemented depending on economic, population growth and ridership trends.

“Mobility as a Service” Comes to Britain’s West Midlands

How would you like to get around Birmingham? Want to hop on the Midland Metro light rail into the city or ride a local bus line? Need a car share or bike share to run some errands? Or would a taxi better serve your needs?

What about being able to choose whichever of these means best suits your purposes at the time for a flat fee each month?

A Finnish company is betting that residents of Britain’s West Midlands region will find that last prospect appealing, and Metro Report International has a story about its launch of a new “mobility as a service” (MaaS) platform there in conjunction with the West Midlands Combined Authority.

The company, MaaS Global, calls its smartphone-based service Whim. Users download a smartphone app that allows them to book rental cars or bikes, hail and pay for taxi rides, and pay for mass transit all from a single point of entry. Users can choose their transport on a pay-as-you-go basis or sign up for one of two subscription-based plans. The Whim Everyday plan includes unlimited public transit rides, discounted taxi fares and discounted bike and car rentals, while Whim Unlimited gives subscribers unlimited public transit, free taxi rides within a five kilometer (3.1 mile) radius of the user’s location and 30 days of car share use per month. Whim Everyday costs £99 ($141.86 U.S.) per month, and Whim Unlimited £349 ($500.08 U.S.) per month.

The Whim app incorporates the Swift smartcard system for public transit travel in the Birmingham region. Participating agencies include bus operator National Express West Midlands, taxi app Gett, Enterprise CarShare and bike share provider Nextbike, which will begin operating in the region later this year.

“We want to challenge the way people start to think about their journeys and let them see that vehicle ownership doesn’t have to be the only way forward,” MaaS Global founder Sampo Hietanen told Metro Report International. “On average, cars are parked up unused for about 96 percent of their lifetime, but we still have to pay for them, sometimes in conjunction with other transport options too.”

MaaS Global has signed up 20,000 users in Helsinki since its launch. The company plans to expand its service to Antwerp later this year and is negotiagting rollouts in Austria, Canada, the Netherlands and Singapore.

Know of a project that should be included in this column? Send a Tweet with links to @MarketStEl using the hashtag #newstarts.

   

Denver Looks to Cannabis Industry to Help Finance Affordable Housing

Since selling marijuana for recreational use became legal in Colorado in 2014, the industry has recorded more than $14 billion in revenues, including $4.4 billion in 2017 and another $4.7 billion in the first two months of 2018 alone. Those revenues are taxed at the state and local levels, and soon, if Denver has its way, some of those dollars will be going directly to fund affordable housing in the fast growing city.

On Monday, the Denver Post reported, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s office presented a proposal to city council that included hiking the city’s local tax on marijuana sales from its current 3.5 percent to 5.5 percent, bringing the total state and local taxes on marijuana purchases in Denver to 25.25 percent. The move would generate an estimated $8 million dollars a year that the city would dedicate to its affordable housing development programs.

“To me, it is a total game-changer, in how we’re thinking about affordable housing, to have these new resources in play,” Brad Segal, the president of Progressive Urban Management Associates, told the Post.

According to the Denver Post, Ashley Kilroy, the city’s licensing and marijuana policy director, consulted marijuana industry representatives about the plan and said she received their support, a point confirmed to the post by Marijuana Industry Group executive director Kristi Kelly.

Coupled with another proposed $7 million a year out of the existing city budget, the mayor’s total proposal would double the city’s annual affordable housing commitment.

Denver City Council originally approved a plan for $15 million a year over ten years for affordable housing, but between rising land acquisition values and continued population growth, housing advocates charged the plan wasn’t moving fast enough. The city estimates 80,000 households in the city are considered cost-burdened because they spend more than 30 percent of their incomes on rent or other housing costs, the Post reports. City officials often repeat the figure that every month, another thousand people move into Denver.

Community land trust backers recently told the city it’s moving so slow, they might take their land trust work elsewhere in Colorado.

It also doesn’t help that the city scaled back monitoring of an affordable homeownership program, allowing hundreds of units meant for affordable homeownership to be sold to buyers earning more than the maximum income technically allowed for those homes.

Meanwhile, although there has been a construction boom in the city, nearly all of the new units are at the luxury end of the market, leading to a glut of about 3,000 vacant luxury units in highly-desirable locations around the city. That led the city’s newly formed economic mobility department to create a new program where area companies help to subsidize units in those buildings, making them affordable for at least two years to 400 families earning between 40 and 80 percent of Denver’s area median income.

The Denver Post reports that city officials promised much of the increased housing production out of the proposed new funding would target the lowest-income category of potential residents, from the homeless to those making up to 30 percent of the metro area’s median household income — $18,900 a year for an individual, or $26,960 for a family of four.

 



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