7 Groundbreaking Landscape Designs

 

On the market: The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

We don’t know a great deal about this place despite some searching around. So we’ll simply run with the The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire. Big thanks to Christian for the spot.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

The Boathouse is definitely the name, modernist the style and 1960s probably the era. It’s a house well maintained, but seemingly unchanged from its original design, both in terms of layout and general finish. A big plus for us.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

Location is likely to be a selling point too. This place is positioned at the end of a private road on the banks of the River Thames, with the house taking full advantage of it. According to the agent, most rooms have extensive and even triple aspect views of the River Thames.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

But the house, as ever, is the star for us. Extensive glazing, wood cladding and a wonderfully open interior. That includes a galleried drawing / family room that overlooks the dining hall, featuring what we imagine is the original sunken seating area.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

The dining room below benefits from the double height ceiling and it is just one of five reception spaces here. There are also four bedrooms and two bathrooms within the 2,800 sq. ft. of accommodation.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

Go beyond the four walls is the garden of course. At the front, you’ll find lawn, plants and trees, with the rear offering more of the same along with an outdoor swimming pool and  access to the River Thames towpath.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

£1,500,000 is the guide price.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire

Images and details courtesy of Hamptons estate agents. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit their website.

The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
The Boathouse 1960s modernist property in Dorney Reach, Maidenhead, Berkshire
 

6 Cities to Split $1M for Placemaking Projects

Congress Square Plaza in Portland, Maine, is destined for a makeover. (AP Photo/David Sharp)

Six U.S. cities will receive grants to redesign underloved or underutilized public spaces, thanks to funding from Southwest Airlines, which teamed up with the Project for Public Spaces (PPS) on the placemaking initiative.

The six cities (and the spaces destined for an upgrade) are Albuquerque, New Mexico (Civic Plaza), Fort Myers, Florida (Cornog Plaza), Jacksonville, Florida (Hemming Park), Milwaukee, Wisconsin (4MKE), Portland, Maine (Congress Square Park), and St. Louis, Missouri (Strauss Park).

“4MKE” refers to a city-owned surface parking lot at 4th Street and Wisconsin Avenue that the city of Milwaukee wants to remake. Congress Square Park is in such desperate need that the city of Portland was considering selling the space to the Westin Hotel.

Baltimore won about $170,000 through the Southwest program last year, which set the city up for a transformation of an underused plaza alongside the Transamerica Tower. According to the Baltimore Business Journal plans for the space include “a small 300-square-foot deck area and a multipurpose kiosk made out of an upgraded cargo container …,” and the “set of stairs leading up to the Transamerica Tower … will also be decked out in seasonally changing art.”

According to a press release, applicants were “evaluated in terms of preliminary work and preparedness, capacity for local impact, potential for large-scale public-private partnerships, and strength of the commitment demonstrated by local partners.”

The money will help with everything from seating to kiosks, and the local partners will get planning help from PPS.

“Placemaking is more than how we design public spaces — it is a means by which people are collectively and intentionally shaping their environment and building deep and lasting community ties,” said Fred Kent, founder and president of PPS. “Placemaking turns our approaches to land use, transportation, governance and the environment upside-down by asking people what they fundamentally need in a public space and empowering them to be a part of the development process.”

 

Calling Civic Innovators to Act Now: Emerging City Champions Fellowship Open for Applications

Photo credit: 8 80 Cities

Sponsored content from 8 80 Cities. Sponsored content policy

Communities around the world are taking big steps towards becoming more livable by thinking small. Parklets, DIY wayfinding, and pop-up bike sharing programs – to name a few – are proving that meaningful improvements to the public realm can be made within months, not years, and funded by hundreds, not millions of dollars. The K880 Emerging City Champions Fellowship program will provide opportunities for 24 civic innovators with this same spirit of civic entrepreneurialism and passion for inclusive community change. With the support of 8 80 Cities, an international nonprofit dedicated to transforming cities, the Emerging City Champions will strengthen mobility, improve public spaces, and enhance civic engagement in their communities.

Powered by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the K880 Emerging City Champions Fellowship is open to young leaders based in the eight resident communities where Knight invests: Akron, OH; Charlotte, NC; Detroit, MI; Macon, GA; Miami, FL; Philadelphia, PA; San Jose, CA; St. Paul, MN. The Emerging City Champions is open to anyone with an innovative idea and the ability to implement it. Applicants may be activists, tactical urbanists, designers, artists, planning professionals, hackers, architects; everyone is welcome. We are seeking applicants from diverse backgrounds with fresh perspectives, and innovative solutions. Innovators and creative problem solvers between the ages of 19-35 are encouraged to apply by May 8, 2015.

The Fellowship has three key objectives: 1) To identify new leaders who will become lifelong champions of their community and work to create people-friendly, livable cities that foster public life and promote civic engagement; 2) To support the creation of 24 “Doable Projects” that will work to advance change in the Champion’s home city; 3) To build a network of Champions who will work together, learn from and support each other.

Successful applicants will be equipped with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make immediate and lasting impact in their communities. The Champions will be invited to attend the Emerging City Champions Studio, taking place June 12-16, 2015 in Toronto, Canada, which was recently named the best city in the world to live in by the Economist. The Emerging City Champions Studio will include guided tours and interactive workshops, where the Champions will work together to refine their project plans. Guest presenters and expert workshop leaders will expose the Champions to inspiring stories of community change, and guide them through each step of developing their projects. The Studio will provide opportunities for the Champions to collaborate and work with peers from their home city in order to establish a local network of support. Upon returning to their home city, each Champion will receive $5,000 to be used towards the implementation of their inclusive community-building project.

Community champions are proving that we can create more livable cities that foster public life and promote civic engagement. Some things take years, but others can happen right now. The K880 Emerging City Champions Fellowship is an opportunity for young leaders who are ready to take action now. By creating a network of support, the Emerging City Champions will empower new voices and establish lifelong community champions.

To apply to the Emerging City Champions Fellowship, click here.

8 80 Cities is a non-profit organization based in Toronto, Canada. We are dedicated to contributing to the transformation of cities into places where people can walk, bike, access public transit and visit vibrant parks and public places. Our approach is to engage people and communities across multiple sectors to inspire the creation of cities that are easily accessible, safe and enjoyable for all. We achieve our mission through grant projects, advocacy work and our innovative services.

 

11 Emerging Talents You Should Know from Salone Satellite 2015

Alex Ortega Rain shelves exhibited at Salone Satellite 2015

Barcelona-based designer Alex Ortega exhibited these crimped metal display shelves. They might not be able to handle your weightiest tomes, but we were smitten with their simplicity and vibrant colors. 

In 1998, Marva Griffin Wilshire established Salone Satellite as a showcase of designers under the age of 35. "There was a such an incredible need—in those days no one was taking care of the young designers," Griffin says. Each practitioner is hand-selected to exhibit and the show has launched many careers: Matali Crasset, Oki Sato, and Patrick Jouin, to name a few, made their debuts at Satellite. This year, we were excited to see experimentation with new materials, pieces that express heritage in a contemporary way, clever multifuntional furniture, as well as items with a sculptural sensibility.

 

 

 

Jasper Morrison curates exhibition chronicling 80 years of Molteni design collaborations

Milan 2015: designer Jasper Morrison has brought together prototypes and iconic designs from the 80-year history of Italian furniture brand Molteni – including early pieces by Gio Ponti and contemporary work by Norman Foster and Alvaro Siza (+ slideshow). (more…)

 

Pattern Focus: The Power of Paisley (11 photos)

While paisley may remind you of men’s neckties, kaleidoscopes and psychedelic ’60s garb, it’s actually an ancient Persian pattern. Aside from being truly interesting to look at, paisley ranges from simple to ornate, large to small and bold to subtle, and even bridges multiple generations....

 

Can Tidying Up Result in Life-Changing Magic? (24 photos)

Marie Kondo’s book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: the Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing did, indeed, change Emily Clay’s life. The Portland, Oregon, woman says that since reading the...

 

Formless Figures by Daniel Arsham

Arsham's approach sees him working from sculpture to architecture, following a distinctive, materials-based process. Artist and architect Daniel Arsham is a master of form, conjuring contemporary consumer objects into archeological artefacts and materialising ghostly figures in the most unexpected of manners. His work can be seen in Frame's newest book  Postdigital Artisans  and is currently on show at The Watermill Center in New York State.
 

Detroit City Council Votes on New Red Wings Arena

A rendering of the proposed Detroit Red Wings hockey arena to be built just north of downtown. The $450 million project is 58 percent publicly funded. (Credit: Olympia Entertainment)

After many delays, the Detroit City Council voted 8-0 to approve the rezoning that will make the Detroit Red Wings’ new arena possible. The holdup was in part due to concerns about historic buildings in the area: the Hotel Eddystone and the Hotel Park Avenue. (The arena has long been at the center of controversy thanks to its public funding.)

Both hotels were built in the 1920s by the same architect, and they’re on the National Register of Historic Places. Olympia Development, part of the company that owns the Red Wings, agreed to restore one in exchange for tearing down the other. An agreement with city council was reached, according to the Detroit Free Press:

The Ilitches’ Olympia Development of Michigan agreed with the city’s request for stronger assurance that the developers will follow through on commitments to redevelop one of two historic hotels near the proposed 20,000-seat arena. The city’s top lawyer, Melvin (Butch) Hollowell, said Olympia agreed to be held to account to complete redevelopment of the Hotel Eddystone under court order, should the city’s law department ever be forced to seek such a move, in exchange for the council’s approval to tear down the adjacent Hotel Park Avenue, another abandoned historic building.

… Councilman Gabe Leland said the council didn’t get all it wanted, but he was comfortable approving the deal. “We were able to say we saved a building in our downtown,” he said.

About 20 percent of the housing in the redevelopment planned around the arena will be affordable, and the Eddystone will be repurposed as mixed-income housing. Though Detroit-based Next City contributor Anna Clark recently argued that the idea of preserving the Hotel Park Avenue shouldn’t be abandoned, she also wrote that there’s “a lot to applaud in the newest version of the plan, especially the increased affordable housing.”

Though the vote passed in city council, it still needs to be approved by Detroit’s Downtown Development Authority. That vote is scheduled for 3 p.m. tomorrow.

One bright spot to note for those who cringe at America’s ongoing embrace of stadium welfare: Detroit City Council is looking to pass a mandatory community benefits agreement ordinance that would force future mega-project developers to meet with neighborhood residents.

 



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Architect Mahmood Fallahian

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