Houzz Tour: Surfer’s Beach House Built for Outdoor Living (22 photos)

Situated in a prime position that is intentionally unassuming at first glance, this Byron Bay, Australia, house backs onto bush reserve, and beyond that, the beach. Its location was key in its design, as the client (a surfer who works from home) wanted to ensure a visual connection between the home and...

 

Out Now

Elephant’s spring issue features a special-edition Elizabeth Peyton double-cover, featuring her works Kristian (2014) and Elias (2014), to celebrate the Paper Gallery of the artist’s new work, curated by Peyton herself.
 

Tourism Rep: Uber, Lyft Turning Indianapolis Into “First-Tier City”

(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

“Adding Uber and Lyft helps us market ourselves as a first-tier city,” an Indianapolis tourism rep told the Indianapolis Star. The city will be allowing Uber and Lift to serve the Indianapolis International Airport this week during the NCAA Final Four.

“These are the kind of choices sophisticated consumers expect,” Gahl told the Star.

Indianapolis is requiring that all taxis charge a flat rate during the busy week when thousands of travelers will be coming to watch their teams fight for the basketball championship. The charge will be $50 for all airport trips and $35 for trips throughout the downtown area.

But not everyone is thrilled with the decision to allow the app-based ride services into the city. According to the Star:

But the cab companies with which the unregulated car services compete said the airport was shortchanging them. Officials said no extra cabs will be allowed at the airport for the Final Four, as they were when the city hosted the Super Bowl in 2012.

“It’s not fair,” said TayeAliou, a manager at Gold Cab, which has 61 drivers. “The only extra drivers being allowed there are for Uber and Lyft.”

Currently, Uber serves 50 airports and Lyft serves six.

 

jonas edvard and nikolaj steenfatt create products using seaweed


the 'terroir project' is a collection of products developed from seaweed and recycled paper by danish designers jonas edvard and nikolaj steenfatt.

The post jonas edvard and nikolaj steenfatt create products using seaweed appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Get Smart with These 6 Energy-Efficient Homes

After walking through the front door visitors enter directly into the enormous kitchen and living space. The interior is minimal, using predominantly timber and concrete. It also provides some spectacular views of the river.

This minimalistic, energy-efficient home in Zurich, Switzerland uses geothermal energy to produce its hot water, and a pair of 300-foot-deep boreholes that transfer warmth through a heat pump provide the under-floor heating. With all of the technology keeping this family off the grid, this house is so efficient that the architect jokes that one light sculpture, made up of two rows of bulbs, which can be seen in the reflection from a window in the living room, uses as much energy as the rest of the house put together. 

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
 

Get Smart with These 6 Energy-Efficient Homes

After walking through the front door visitors enter directly into the enormous kitchen and living space. The interior is minimal, using predominantly timber and concrete. It also provides some spectacular views of the river.

This minimalistic, energy-efficient home in Zurich, Switzerland uses geothermal energy to produce its hot water, and a pair of 300-foot-deep boreholes that transfer warmth through a heat pump provide the under-floor heating. With all of the technology keeping this family off the grid, this house is so efficient that the architect jokes that one light sculpture, made up of two rows of bulbs, which can be seen in the reflection from a window in the living room, uses as much energy as the rest of the house put together. 

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
 

Deep Spring Cleaning: 20 Little and Big Things You Might Be Forgetting (10 photos)

With the sun finally peeking out after a long, cold winter, freshening your house with a deep spring cleaning can feel really good. If you’re ready...

 

Norm Architects creates minimal bathroom furniture for Ex.t

Milan 2015: Danish studio Norm Architects has created a collection of bathroom furnishings and accessories, including a matching wash basin and bathtub perched on slim metal legs (+ slideshow). (more…)

 

Shop Houzz: Mother’s Day Gifts for Moms-to-Be (70 photos)

Mother’s Day is an extra-special occasion for the newest members of the mom club. Help them celebrate this holiday as an honoree for the very first time with presents to use once the baby comes, or gifts to relax now and after the little one’s arrival. This Houzz Shop collection is your guide to...

 

City Council Candidate: We Need to Shed Parks

(AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Despite the health and wellness benefits of green space, cities are choosing to sell off parkland in order to pay their bills. And space isn’t the only thing for sale — “naming rights” have increasingly become an item on the bake sale table. Recently, San Diego County Parks and Recreation Department announced plans to exchange the names of trails, playgrounds, roller rinks, recreation fields — even rooms in community centers — for money.

A few new stories about city governments peddling green space for cash have recently caught my eye.

Carving Open Space Out of Public Housing Developments
Even though the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) has gone back to the drawing board with major plans to lease land for the development of luxury housing, it has been quietly putting smaller plots of land on the chopping block. In the past few years, green spaces, playgrounds and parking lots have peen sold piecemeal for the creation of affordable and senior housing.

The New York Daily News reports that since 2013, the housing authority has sold 54 parcels totaling around 441,000 square feet of NYCHA-owned land to private developers.

Calling the land “underutilized,” NYCHA hopes that the sales will help to put a dent in their $98 million budget gap for the year. In a statement, NYCHA director Shola Olatoye told the paper, “Given this reality, we are exploring all options available to bring in additional revenue that will help us better serve residents.”

But residents have a number of concerns, including questions about how these transactions intersect with other privatization plans the authority has and if the land might be worth more than the price at which NYCHA is selling it. They also see the land as a much-needed amenity: A tenant leader from the Van Dyke Houses in Brownsville, Brooklyn mourned the loss of a parking lot by saying, “This is where the kids learned to ride their bikes … If you take that, where are they going to go?”

NYCHA is discussing selling off another lot in the development that’s used for football, basketball and social gatherings. Olatoye has promised more clarity about the housing authority’s plans to sell and lease land as the upcoming Next Generation NYCHA plan is rolled out.

Fort Lauderdale Brushes Aside Plan for Downtown Park
Residents of the city’s Flagler Village are urging the city to create a new park out of a 3.5-acre site close to the city center.

But City Manager Lee Feldman is claiming that a future park would only end up being another hangout space for the city’s homeless population. Meanwhile, a real estate consultant’s report says that the value of the land could be between $11 million and $13 million if redeveloped, potentially for a multi-family or senior-living development.

Feldman told the Sun-Sentinal that the property is “clearly the gem of the [city’s] portfolio.” Locals see this fact as the perfect reason to ensure the space is preserved for the public. “We can’t just not do parks because we’re working on a management issue with homeless people. We need to do both,” the president of the Flagler Village Civic Association told the paper.

Will Evansville Choose a Leslie Knope or a Ron Swanson?
The Parks and Recreation Department of the Illinois town maintains more than 2,500 acres between 65 parks. But since the department is more than $500,000 in the red, whether or not to sell land has become an issue in Evansville’s upcoming City Council election.

One candidate for a position representing the Second Ward, Steve Davis, is arguing that sales are necessary to guarantee maintenance and upkeep of the remaining parks. The ward’s incumbent, Missy Mosby, is arguing that alternative funding streams and increasing residents’ ownership of local green spaces is key to improving park quality. Davis told the Evansville Courier & Press:

“We’re not taking care of our parks. We’re not maintaining them. They’re not safe. They’re not being utilized by the public. So I would like to downsize the parks department,” Davis said. “We need to shed them.”

The Democratic primary on May 5th might determine the future of park preservation in Evansville.

 



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