A’ Design Award & Competition: Winners

Do you have a great design that deserves attention of worldwide media in all languages? Then you should join the A’ Design Awards.
 

discover the art of spare parts with OFFBITS toy robots


originally designed with unused and unloved bits and pieces, the tiny robots now come in built-it-yourself kits that can be infinitely customized with your own spare parts.

The post discover the art of spare parts with OFFBITS toy robots appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Editors' Picks from Salone del Mobile 2015: Day Two

Patricia Urqiola's Shimmer coffee tables for Glas Italia

Patricia Urquiola's delightfully iridescent Shimmer coffee tables for Glas Italia change color as you move around the piece.

 

5 Low-Maintenance, Age-Friendly Homes We Love

Corrugated aluminum screen porch

After thirty years, retired journalist and professor Bruce Porter built a green getaway cottage in Criehaven, Maine, with the help of his architect daugher, Alex Scott Porter. With only two of many appliances operating off propane, “there was a general feeling that this house wasn’t going to work," Bruce laughs. "But everything works great, just like a normal house!” 

Photo by Eirik Johnson.
 

Sigmar Polke

Head to Michael Werner Gallery, New York, for Silver Paintings by Sigmar Polke. This presentation is the first time since their debut, in 1990, that the Silver Paintings have been exhibited. The exhibition offers the opportunity to experience a rarely-seen body of experimental works by one of the most important artists of the post-war period.
 

Vidigal House by Contaminar has a V-shaped plan enclosing a triangular garden

This house on a hillside in Leiria, Portugal, has two wings –  a three-storey block that follows the slope of the site, and a bedroom block that cantilevers out at an angle (+ slideshow). (more…)

 

How to Fix a Stinky Garbage Disposal (6 photos)

Does this sound familiar? You’ve cleaned your kitchen to spotless hygienic perfection, but you catch a whiff of something rotten every time you pass the sink. There’s a piece of something you threw down there and ground up days ago that’s stuck in the garbage disposal, and the smell only gets worse...

 

On the market: 1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

Take your pick between modernism and brutalism, but we’ve gone for the 1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden as our description.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

It’s a stunning place, not only for the architecture, but for the location. Found in one of the area’s most sought after postcodes and described by the agent as a part of Sweden’s architectural history, the house was built in 1970s, the work of Leonie (Lola) Geisendorf, who studied under Le Corbusier.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

The outside is all austere concrete and glazing, which is in stark contrast to the much softer Scandinavian feel of the inside. It’s a contrast that works well. Talking of working well also brings us to the balconies and glazing, which take advantage of that the wonderful coastal location. A dream  home in a dream location.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

As we said, go beyond the exterior ‘concrete villa’ and you’ll find a house that’s all light and space within, thanks in part to the clean walls, open living areas and double height ceilings. Modernised obviously, but not to the point of adversely affecting the design.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

As for the space, there is an ‘airy’ living room with fireplace, large glass windows and high ceilings, along with a dining room, kitchen, guest toilet, office and laundry on the ground floor.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

Head up the feature staircase and you’ll find a further living room, master bedroom with en suite bathroom and fireplace plus three additional bedrooms and a shower room.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

The garden was apparently designed by ‘Sweden’s foremost landscape architect’ Ulf Nordfjell and is described as a ‘park-like oasis’ with greenery, trees, an orangery, several terraces and patios plus low concrete walls.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden

Fancy living here? Well, if you do you’ll need 29,000,000 kr, which works out at around £2,236,369.

Images and details courtesy of the Per Jansson estate agents. For more images, details and enquiries, please visit the website http://www.perjansson.se/till-salu/djursholm-strandvagen-43/.

1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
1970s Leonie Geisendorf-designed Villa Delin brutalist property in Djursholm, Sweden
 

Great Design Plant: Polemonium Reptans Paints Woodlands Blue in Spring (4 photos)

The large, light blue flowers of Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium reptans) provide color and a unique texture in the spring shade garden. Use this easy-to-grow, reliable native plant in any shady garden, whether under trees, intermixed with other spring-flowering wildflowers or...

 

Here’s What Happens When You Really Try to Help 40,000 Low-Income People

(AP Photo/James A. Finley)

If there were just one perfect solution to every urban problem, we could probably get away with publishing fewer words on Next City each day. Instead, smart cities — and planners and advocates and so on — tackle the challenges cities face with a pretty big toolbox.

Just last month, contributor Marielle Mondon wrote about an Urban Institute report that argued that “the most effective way to beat poverty in New York would be a combination of … programs — which could cut the overall poverty rate in the city by between 44 and 69 percent.” In the arsenal: increasing the number of housing vouchers, New York City’s earned-income tax credit, and the Paycheck Plus program.

A new self-study from LISC (LISC) underscores the payoff of a multi-pronged approach. After analyzing its own efforts to help people find financial health, the community development organization notes that low-income people have a better chance at economic stability when they access a “bundled” set services: namely, job training/placement services, public benefits and financial coaching.

The study looked at 40,000 low-income clients (of LISC’s financial opportunity centers) who received assistance with job placement, budget-setting, improving credit and saving for the future. Of those who were most engaged with the program, 74 percent were placed in jobs, 78 percent retained those jobs, and 76 percent raised their net incomes.

The report also breaks down how that assistance, individually and bundled, has played out in dollars and cents:

“What sets [these LISC centers] apart from traditional workforce development programs is the bundling of employment services and financial coaching — those are at its core,” Michael Rubinger, president and CEO of LISC, said in a statement. “Families that have struggled for years — and in some cases, for generations — find that they have someone in their corner, a financial coach who understands how to address their challenges and can help them change course. That can make all the difference.”

 



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