1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

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1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

Anyone for a glass box? There’s a rather attractive one for sale. The 1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

Look familiar? It was on the market (and sold) a few years back and has since been lived in and upgraded a little before returning to the market. So if you missed out then, you are in luck.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

Thankfully, those upgrades haven’t affected the character of this place, which is great news as the house is packed with it.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

The house dates back to 1964, the work of Harry Rockwell, who was a student of modernist legend Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. But you might have guessed that just by looking at the house.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

He designed this place for himself, mixing bold modernist design with an eye for practical family living. This isn’t just a ‘glass box’, it is a very functional space for a modern family.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

That’s perhaps because a lot of space is housed on a lower level, which includes some of the bedrooms, bathrooms, a workshop, TV room, laundry and more.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

Indeed, the current owners have moved the master suite from the main floor to that lower level, combining two bedrooms below for more space. Where that master once stood is now an additional lounge area.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

So yes, some changes there by the current architect / designer owners, as well as an updated kitchen and some other contemporary finishes and background updates that you might appreciate. I like the idea of the skylights that close when there’s a hint of rain, for example.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

But the character is largely untouched and there is so much to love. From those walls of glass and the concrete frame to the open living spaces and spiral staircase. Very stylish.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

There’s around 3,600 sq. ft. in total, which includes four bedrooms and three bathrooms, as well as reception space and the rooms outlined above. You also get 2.49 acres outside, with the wooded setting offering the seclusion you probably need with a house like this. A detached garage too.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

$619,000 was the price back in 2015, but in light of the work (and perhaps the market too), the asking price is now $749,000.

Images and details courtesy of Baird & Warner. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell property in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell House in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA
1960s H.P. Davis Rockwell property in Olympia Fields, Illinois, USA

Via Curbed Chicago

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Land Trust Helps Oakland’s Hasta Muerte Coffee Stay Put

(Credit: Hasta Muerte Coffee)

The Oakland Community Land Trust is at it again. After helping to save the building housing Peacock Rebellion — which serves queer and trans people of color in Oakland — along with several other grassroots organizations and low-income housing units, the organization has teamed up with Hasta Muerte Coffee to deal another blow to the city’s ever-encroaching gentrification market.

The worker-owner collective that runs Hasta Muerte announced last week that it had successfully purchased its mixed-use building, after learning that it had been put on the market earlier this year, the East Bay Express reports.

“TGIF WE BOUGHT A BUILDING,” the collective wrote on Instagram. “After 45 or so days of fundraising, fundraisers, loan negotiations, generous donations of all kinds, bombarding you on social media, meetings, and meetings we are excited, anxious, nervous and *happy* to share that on [J]uly 11th the sale closed….”

Hasta Muerte successfully crowdfunded upwards of $50,000, according to the paper, and the land trust served as the initial buyer. It plans to eventually transfer the building to the collective, and keep the deed to land that it sits on in trust for perpetuity, to ensure the building isn’t sold at market rate. That’s customary for land trusts, as Next City has covered — and similar to the deal the nonprofit made with the building housing Peacock Rebellion earlier this year. The tenants of that building also plan to purchase the building outright from the land trust, in that case within a period of 15 years. In the meantime, land trust staff plan to train them in building management best practices.

Hasta Muerte has become a community hub since its opening, although one worker’s refusal to serve a uniformed police officer earlier this year — protesting what the collective referred to as Oakland Police Department’s “history of corruption, mismanagement, and scandal” and “legacy of blatant repression” — earned it a flurry of negative online reviews and alt-right media coverage.

 

batek and bruzkus’ cinema in berlin is designed as a series of artpieces


the auditoriums are all different colors — while one of them is entirely black — and are illuminated by LED color changing strips.

The post batek and bruzkus’ cinema in berlin is designed as a series of artpieces appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Fifteen-City Bike-Share Launches in Massachusetts

(Photo by Mike Licht)

In the Boston area, city-based bike-share is so 2016. Last year, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council announced that it would create a regional system involving more than a dozen small towns and cities. Earlier this year, it signed contracts with two private dockless bike-share operators. Now, that synched-up system has finally begun rolling out, the Boston Globe reports.

So far, the program is up and running in the towns of Malden, Everett, Chelsea, Winthrop and Arlington, all with the help of LimeBike, according to the paper. By the end of summer a total of 15 small cities will be actively participating, meaning that residents in those cities will be able to rent bikes from their smartphones or with cash and ride anywhere within the towns’ collective borders. The Massachusetts cities participating include Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Milton, Needham, Newton, Revere, Waltham, Watertown, and Winthrop.

“Dockless bike sharing brings another transportation option to residents that offers both convenience and a method to reduce one’s carbon footprint,” Arlington Town Manager Adam Chapdelaine said recently, according to the Globe. “As this new program grows we hope to find cost-efficient means to expand the region.”

Bike-share start-ups like LimeBike, Spin and Ofo are increasingly attractive to small, cash-strapped cities because, unlike the public-private partnerships built up in cities like Chicago and New York, they don’t require tax-payer funding upfront. That doesn’t mean they’re universally beloved — a number of policymakers have expressed fear that the start-ups’ venture-funded model incentivizes quick, cheap roll-outs without adequate consideration of the transportation system as a whole or equity-planning to reach already transportation-starved areas. And then there’s the fact that the systems themselves are dockless — and could potentially create a whole lot of sidewalk clutter.

Still, as Marc Draisen, executive director of Metropolitan Area Planning Council, pointed out last year, the model is promising for inter-agency partnerships, particularly in suburban communities where municipalities bleed together.

“These recent rapid changes in the bike-share industry have created a unique opportunity for Boston’s suburbs to launch a large-scale regional bike-share system without having to raise large amounts of public capital,” he said at the time, according to WickedLocal Concord. “Our goal is to have high-quality bikes that will be well maintained, in a system that is easily accessible throughout the participating communities — and we want a seamless experience for riders crossing municipal lines.”

That doesn’t mean, however, that the start-ups have a patent on inter-jurisdictional partnerships. As Next City has covered, established P3s like the Bay Area’s Ford GoBike and New York’s CitiBike have also had some success with multi-city expansions.

 

See the best graduate work at Blueprint for the Future

Blueprint for the Future is a free, three-day showcase of the work of the brightest, most interesting and challenging architecture students graduating Part II across London, as selected by Blueprint Magazine.
 

rimowa taps FENDI for second luxe aluminum cabin trolley collaboration


the hard luggage case is composed of rimowa's signature durable aluminum, emblazoned with FENDI's iconic double 'F' logo.

The post rimowa taps FENDI for second luxe aluminum cabin trolley collaboration appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

DesignCurial in Conversation: Lisa Haude of Paradigm Design Group

Having created interiors for a multitude of high-end hospitality brands, US-based Paradigm Design Group know a thing or two about luxury design. We speak to Paradigm’s co-founder, Lisa Haude, to find out more.
 

austin+mergold & cornell university build city of dreams from metal grain bins in new york


the 'oculi' installation aims to promote sustainability-oriented thinking amidst the architecture and design communities, requiring them to consider the environmental impact of their works.

The post austin+mergold & cornell university build city of dreams from metal grain bins in new york appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Philadelphia Says Goodbye to Yet Another Historic Building

Demolition of thie historic Christian Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia began last week.  (Photo by Jared Brey)

It’s a sight that Philadelphians are growing used to seeing — demolition crews peeling the bricks and mortar off of a beloved but taken-for-granted old building in the heart of a changing neighborhood, with the promise of nothing but more of the same expensive housing to take its place.

The former Christian Street Baptist Church, a small church built for a growing community of Italian immigrants in the 1890s and later owned for most of the 20th century by an African-American Baptist congregation. The church had been a flashpoint in the city’s simmering crisis of demolition during a time when officials and advocates are trying to rethink how historic preservation works in the city and make it both stronger and more inclusive, as Next City has covered. But preservationists’ attempts to save the church, which was not listed on the local register of historic places, ultimately failed. The building’s demolition began last week.

“It’s the loss of a neighborhood landmark that’s been there longer than anyone can remember, since the 1890s, and that in another climate would have been a great candidate for adaptive reuse,” says Paul Steinke, executive director of the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia, who spent months trying to find a buyer for the church who would save it from demolition. “Losing that really kind of cuts at the heart of the character of that community. So it’s painful to see it go. And in a city that lacks any real incentives for preservation, it’s hard to compete in the housing boom.”

Preservationists first tried to intervene last fall, after the congregation had found a buyer willing to pay $1.5 million for the church, with the expectation that it would be demolished and replaced with housing. The Philadelphia Historical Commission was split over whether to designate the building historic, which would have prevented demolition. The shrinking congregation argued that they couldn’t afford to maintain the building, and listing it on the register would deprive them of the value of the sale. Ultimately not enough commissioners voted in favor of designation.

The saga dragged on for months. The buyer, Ori Feibush, said that he would sign the contract over to anyone who would save the church and pay his cost of $1.5 million, and later said he would sell it for $1 million. But Feibush says that one potential buyer who came in with a last-minute offer couldn’t show proof of funds.

Was the decision to move forward with demolition difficult?

“Yes and no,” Feibush says. “I put the property under contract initially with the expectation of demolition and the church listed it for sale with the expectation of demolition. So in that context, it was the first option and the preferred option when we began the process.”

The problem is that preservation isn’t competitive with demolition and redevelopment in the city, Feibush says. He says he thought he was “doing a good thing” by allowing time for a buyer to come forward. But ultimately he believes preservationists were just trying to buy time until his demolition permits expired. If his company hadn’t bought the property with the intention of demolishing it, he says, half a dozen others would have swept in with a similar plan. It’s convenient to blame the developer, but “the system is broken,” he says: If the city wants to prevent more demolitions like this, it has to create policies that narrow the gulf between what properties are worth with old churches on them and what they’re worth as vacant land.

“It’s a shame,” Feibush says. “Upzoning would help a lot. Substantive incentives would help a lot. People going to church more frequently would help a lot.”

Steinke faults Feibush for not accepting an offer when he had said he would. But he agrees that the problems are systemic.

“We need to expand protections, both through historic districts and individual designations,” Steinke says. “And we need to institute more incentives for preservation, including not allowing the tax abatement to be used on buildings that are on the local or national register. You should not be rewarded by the taxpayers for tearing down historic buildings.”

Some are publicly doubting that the preservation task force appointed by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney will come up with any significant solutions for preservation issues in the city. Steinke says there’s still reason to hope that the group’s recommendations will be meaningful. But the task force process is slow-moving, and the building boom is frantic. And Steinke says that until new policy recommendations are released and enacted, more buildings like Christian Street Baptist Church are threatened.

“Churches are right in the bullseye of desirable sites,” he says. “They usually occupy bigger lots. They often have weak-to-nonexistent congregations. The buildings themselves often suffer from various degrees of neglect. So it’s like moths to a flame: Developers are attracted to them.”

Next City’s coverage of Philadelphia’s changing neighborhoods is made possible with the support of the William Penn Foundation.

 

Pew: Income Gap Now Widest Among Asian Americans

(Credit: Pew Research)

Income inequality is often presented as a study in socioeconomic or racial difference — the racial wealth gap, for example, or comparisons of household income in rural vs. urban America. But, as Pew Research Center recently pointed out, another “important part of the story of rising income inequality is that experiences within America’s racial and ethnic communities vary strikingly from one group to the other.”

Take America’s Asian population — which now has the widest gap between its top and bottom earners, according to a new report from the research center.

From the report:

From 1970 to 2016, the gap in the standard of living between Asians near the top and the bottom of the income ladder nearly doubled, and the distribution of income among Asians transformed from being one of the most equal to being the most unequal among America’s major racial and ethnic groups.

In this process, Asians displaced blacks as the most economically divided racial or ethnic group in the U.S….

Asian Americans, of course, aren’t alone. According to Pew, the income gap between ALL Americans at the top and the bottom of the income distribution widened a whopping 27 percent over that same 46 years.

But the widening gap within the country’s Asian population is part of a story of several immigration laws, according to the research organization. Immigrants accounted for 81 percent of the growth in the adult Asian population from 1970 to 2016, following the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. That law favored family reunification, and, together with the end of the Vietnam War, it brought a wave of refugees into the U.S.

“One result was that the share of new Asian immigrants working in high-skill occupations decreased from 1970 to 1990, and the share working in low-skill occupations increased,” according to the report.

More recently, however, the Immigration Act of 1990 (which sought to increase the inflow of skilled immigrants to the U.S.) coincided with a tech boom that brought a new wave of Asian immigrants from India under the H-1B visa program.

“Thus, since 1990, there has been an increase in the share of Asian immigrants employed in high-skill occupations,” according to the report.

The new data will likely be helpful for equity-focused policymakers — who haven’t always seen Asian Americans included in large research projects. Even when they are, “Asian” is itself a broad category that masks many historic ethnicities with differing median hourly wages and household incomes.

That variation, as Next City has covered, is a particular challenge for both the Asians and Pacific Islanders because of the “model minority” myth.

“On educational attainment or disconnected youth, they’re doing better as a group than others, but it’s really masking a lot,” Sarah Treuhaft, director of equitable growth initiatives at PolicyLink, told Next City in 2016. “It’s detrimental to the groups who aren’t doing as well.”

Pew’s report can be viewed here.

 



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