prada mode miami opens with site-specific intervention by theaster gates


imagined as a club that augments and extends significant global cultural gatherings, the platform offers music, conversation, food, and fashion.

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More Lawmakers Looking Into Banning Cashless Restaurants

In this Tuesday, April 10, 2018, photo, employees prepare customers food at Peli Peli Kitchen in Houston. Owner Thomas Nguyen had a change of heart after transitioning one of his three Peli Peli South African fine dining restaurants and his Peli Peli Kitchen fast casual location to a no-cash policy. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

A New York City council member is proposing that the city outlaw businesses that don’t accept cash, the Associated Press reports.

Democratic City Councilman Ritchie Torres represents a part of the Bronx where one in four households have no bank account, the NY Daily News said. Citywide, hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers lack a credit or debit card.

The law would force New York retailers to accept cash along with credit cards, or pay up to $500 per violation.

Many New York City businesses are already cashless or in the process of converting. It’s hard to get exact numbers on how many businesses are cashless, but Gothamist pulled together a short list: “Dos Toros, Dig Inn, Sweetgreen, Two Forks, Bluestone Lane coffee, many Danny Meyer establishments, the list goes on,” Claire Lampen wrote.

Other cities have also become alarmed at the practice of restaurants and retailers going cash-free. In Washington, D.C., Councilmember David Grosso introduced the Cashless Retailers Prohibition Act of 2018, calling banning cash “a discriminatory practice that disproportionately affects” the 10 percent of D.C. residents who are unbanked and the additional 25 percent who are “underbanked.” In a press release announcing the legislation, Grosso also said that by banning cash, “businesses are effectively telling lower-income and young patrons that they are not welcome.” (Ironically, WMATA, the agency that runs Metrobus and Metrorail in the city, has been mulling expanding cashless buses while this debate has been ongoing, although the cashless bus question is shelved for now.)

Philadelphia lawmakers have also introduced a ban on cashless businesses, as have lawmakers in Chicago. Only Massachusetts currently bans cashless businesses, thanks to an “obscure” law dating from 1978, but the state retailers association says it’s not enforced.

New Jersey introduced legislation this summer that would have banned cashless establishments. The bill was overwhelmingly approved by the state’s lower house, but the state Senate shelved the bill when Walmart and Amazon, which is testing cashier-less stores, expressed concerns. This week, with HQ2 effectively off the table, the Senate committee voted to advance the bill.

Businesses, on the other hand, say going cash-free is more efficient. One D.C. juice store owner said that going cashless came down to it being simply too difficult keeping track of all the cash at her six locations since her bank wasn’t always in a convenient place.

The lack of cash on hand makes a store a less tempting robbery target, too, businesses say. Still, nationwide, about a quarter of consumers still make all their purchases with cash, Vox reported. Some do so because they don’t have enough money to have a bank account, or can’t afford the risk of overdrafts. Some simply don’t trust banks or have identity theft or privacy concerns.

And what about the fact that cash is still legal tender? Slate reports that that doesn’t really apply here. Cash can be used to settle a debt, but until the restaurant has agreed to sell you a taco, you haven’t actually incurred a debt. Courts have sided with businesses that refuse certain types of cash on a reasonable basis such as when doing so increases efficiency, prevents incompatibility problems with the equipment employed to accept or count the money, or improves security.” That’s why it’s legal for stores to refuse large bills or for soda machines not to take pennies.

Going cashless could hurt the unbanked in more ways than by excluding them from certain stores, Slate says. Brenton Peck, a senior manager at the nonprofit Center for Financial Services Innovation, told the publication: “Encouraging more adoption of card products by pushing the cashless society could compromise people’s financial health. We’re forcing a segment of the population to act in ways they otherwise wouldn’t.” In other words, some people prefer (or would prefer if they had the choice) cash because they don’t have to worry about over-drafting their bank accounts.

In New York, Torres introduced the legislation Wednesday and it has been referred to committee.

   

KPF reveals new mixed-use project in shanghai with cantilevered gallery spaces


by incorporating cantilevers at the mid-point of the towers, the project creates a unique identity within the shanghai skyline.

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david adjaye designs BRIT awards 2019 statue cast in solid glass


'my take on the BRIT trophy is the manifestation of a great material forged in fire and shaped into the body of a woman.'

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BMW vision iNEXT concept car: our favorite space at LA auto show 2018


with an interior like never before in the automotive industry, adrian van hooydonk, BMW group’s VP of design, details the shy tech designs for the BMW vision iNEXT.

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a peak inside aston martin’s vanquish zagato shooting brake


in stark contrast to its cherry red reveal, the sports car has made a more subtle second debut.

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zaha hadid architects + a_lab to complete two stations in oslo as part of new metro line


with a design that calls to mind norway's mountainous landscape, the fornebu senter station carves canyons and spaces for the flow of people.

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Durham’s New Blueprint for Equitable Community Engagement

Durham is planning to convert an old railroad spur into a 1.7-mile trail cutting through downtown. (Photo by Matt Walter CC BY-SA 2.0)

Tara Mei Smith and Justin Robinson have deep roots in Durham, N.C.. Smith’s family dates back nine generations, with her indigenous ancestors coming through the trading path and European ancestors arriving in the mid-1700s. Robinson’s great-great grandparents came to Durham from South Carolina in the early 1900s for banking, because they weren’t allowed to do it back home, and to sell cotton, where they often got a better price.

Smith and Robinson are behind Extra Terrestrial Projects, a nonprofit in Durham and New York creatively connecting city residents to nature. The pair’s history in Durham informs their investment in its future. In creating a native plant prairie on public land downtown, “we had an ear to the ground on a lot of the upcoming big green infrastructure projects” in Durham, Smith says.

For example, this summer the City Council approved a master plan for the Durham Belt Line, a proposal to transform an old railroad spur once used to transport tobacco into a 1.7-mile trail cutting through downtown.

“We realized none of our partners in communities of color or affordable housing or equitable development knew about it,” says Smith (who is also a Next City Vanguard). “And then there were precedents set by the Atlanta Belt Line and High Line, showing that green gentrification is happening. We needed to do this differently.”

In Durham, a 53.9 percent black and brown city, one in five renters receives an eviction notice a year. Fears of Atlanta Belt Line-esque gentrification were felt most acutely in neighborhoods along the eastern end of the trail, home to communities of color and cost-burdened renters.

An early Durham Belt Line survey only engaged 250 people with a median income of $90,000, Smith notes — and yet the median income along the trail is roughly $36,000. Smith saw it as an example of “a systemic problem across most community engagement processes.”

In response to such concerns, City Council tasked the city with developing an equitable community engagement plan ahead of any construction. It was recently released by the Durham’s Neighborhood Improvement Services Department as the Equitable Community Engagement Blueprint.

The blueprint goes beyond addressing the Durham Belt Line.

“It didn’t make sense to make a community engagement plan specific to the Belt Line without thinking of what is equitable engagement,” says Jacob Lerner, community engagement coordinator at the department. “We had to take a step back before we even starting thinking about the Belt Line.”

Beyond the blueprint, city leaders have taken a hard look at racist policies and how they inform inequities in Durham. The city joined the Government Alliance on Race and Equity; it formed a Racial Equity Task Force; many city staff now go through race equity training.

In addition, city staff members are working with a community representative to explore how to preserve Durham’s legacy of black-owned businesses through employee-ownership, as Next City covered recently.

The city is also crafting its 2019 strategic plan with equity in mind. “There are equity efforts drafted throughout the entire plan, and initiatives to help us achieve those goals within the three years of the plan,” says James Davis, assistant director of Neighborhood Improvement Services.

Planners with the Neighborhood Improvement Services Department found that existing city plans often address equity and engagement separately. With the blueprint they sought to define, and set goals around, equitable community engagement.

One key component is shifting the engagement paradigm: “The onus is on the city to invest the resources to ensure underrepresented demographics have a voice in the process,” it reads. “It is not enough to say someone is not in the room, the city must ask why.”

Other components include collecting data to understand who is underrepresented in engagement, centering race and understanding racist city policies of the past, and undertaking efforts like door knocking and events hosted with local organizations to bring more people to the planning table.

“It’s definitely a culture shift,” says Laura Biediger, community engagement coordinator at the Neighborhood Improvement Services Department. “We’ve had several meetings with other [city] departments who are trying to understand the idea, and we’re helping them understand each component of why it’s important to have the community at the planning table.”

Everyone interviewed with Neighborhood Improvement Services emphasized the blueprint, which was drafted in 90 days, is strictly a draft. Beyond informing Belt Line planning, they see it as a working document that will grow beyond project-based engagement to a more general, pervasive engagement between residents and the city.

“The blueprint is essentially an opportunity for us to look at our current practices, create additional best practices to document the outcome, and we hope that outcome shows that we’ve improved civic engagement across all demographics,” says Davis.

To Smith and Robinson, it’s a meaningful step forward that will likely introduce difficult conversations around inequity.

“There’s some precedent … for folks feeling like the powers that be are conspiring against them to move them out of the city,” Robinson says — for example, the construction of the Durham freeway in 1958 decimated the city’s core black neighborhoods, dooming what was Durham’s famous “Black Wall Street.”

Smith says that in engagement around the Belt Line, residents are saying they have more pressing needs — they’re not asking for investment in a bike lane, they’re asking for other investments that they’ve been asking for decades.

“Our hope is for a larger movement of equitable green infrastructure,” Smith says. “We have to ask [the city] who are you building this for, and where is the desire coming from. A top-down approach won’t work.”

This story is part of The Power of Parks, a series exploring how parks and recreation facilities and services can help cities achieve their goals in wellness, conservation and social equity. The Power of Parks is supported by a grant from the National Recreation and Park Association.

 

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

WowHaus
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

The finish of this 1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23 really does set it above houses of a similar design.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

This one, as the title says, dates from the 1960s, part of a terrace set around a ‘quiet’ communal green and a short walk from Forest Hill station if you need the exact geography.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

But this certainly isn’t a time capsule, Far from it. The ‘shell’ of the place and some of the original details remain, but this one has been on the end of a complete renovation of late.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

Now that’s not always a good thing. In fact, the word renovation is often a cause for concern. But it’s also an opportunity to rethink and restyle a house, which is the case with this one.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

There are still three floors of accommodation, covering something like 1,274 sq. ft. in total over its three floors, with the original (and rather lovely) staircase taking you up to the top and back again. But on each of the floors, the space has had a makeover.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

Generally, the finish is modern and understated. Clean, modern(ist) style in keeping with the surroundings and obviously done to a very high standard. This could be a feature for an interiors magazine rather than an estate agent’s listing.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

Some vintage touches remain, both in terms of the house and the fixtures and fittings. But overall, you are looking at a contemporary restyling of a house without forgetting its past.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

Entry is on the ground floor through an original fluted glass front door, taking you into a large and newly fitted kitchen with maple flooring. Plenty of light too, thanks to the sizeable triple-glazed sliding Internorm windows, which take you into the rear garden.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

At the front of the property is what’s described as an ‘intimate’ living room with original parquet flooring.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

Stairs to the upper levels retain the original hardwood balustrades. According to the agent, on the first floor, a translucent fluted panel ‘amplifies the sense of space’, pouring light in from a former reception room that is currently used as a textile studio. On the same level is a large bedroom and bathroom.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

On the second floor is the master bedroom with ‘panoramic views’ of London’s skyline, a rear-facing bedroom, overlooking the garden and a shower room with a walk-in shower.

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23

 

The property also has plenty of storage options, including an attic, separate garage, and a bike storage unit.

That’s about the size of it. Check out the imagery, as that really does tell the story of this one. If you fancy living here, the asking price is £825,000.

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

 

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury house in London SE23

 

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury house in London SE23

 

1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23
1960s midcentury house in London SE23

 

The post 1960s midcentury townhouse in London SE23 appeared first on WowHaus.

 



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