Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

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Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

I think this is the most bizarre house I have ever featured and if you want something a little different, the Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA is now on the market.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

Bizarre, but fascinating and interesting at the same time. I’ll try to make some sense of it.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

Bioscleave House (aka the Life-Span Extending Villa) is the work of avant-garde artist Madeline Gins and ‘Arakawa-proteges’ of the surrealist artist Marcel Duchamp. This is apparently the only house they designed and built ‘to test 50 years of research through this experimental, provocative laboratory’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The finished item is described as an ‘architectural body’ studio-house and a ‘stimulating environment for healthy living’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

There are actually two connected houses, the ‘back’ Bioscleave House and the ‘front’ original A-frame house. The back house is perhaps the most instantly eye-catching part of this place, said to be ‘a landscape of shifting forms’ in 52 colours and covering 2,700 sq. ft.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

But the front, which is connected by a new link, can’t be ignored. That’s an architecturally significant 1960s property covering 900 sq. ft. and designed by Harvard architect Carl Koch, who took inspiration from the Bauhaus movement to create a ‘simple, economical, modern’ summer cottage.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The front house has a living room with fireplace, two bedrooms, one and a half baths, full basement, oil heating and air conditioning, and floor-to-ceiling sliding doors and windows. Pretty straightforward.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The back house is a little more…challenging. It looks like some kind of lunar surface within or perhaps a beach? Maybe even a kid’s play area. Whatever it is, the impact is strong.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

There are more bedrooms here and an extra bathroom, but that’s not the space I’m really talking about. I’m looking at the ‘landing sites’ – large, high and open cubic volumes, as well was the numerous ‘metaphysical’ small slopes, hills, nooks and crannies that are designed to ‘stimulate’ the feet and with the overall ambition of being ‘a kind of kaleidoscopic laboratory or incubator for living well and longer’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The differences between the two spaces is intentional, a mix of the simple and the complex, with the intention of ‘living life as perpetual exercise’ in an environmental juxtaposition for puzzling about living life as art and art as living life-inside and out.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

I know, very confusing, but interesting nonetheless. If you want a more challenging living space, this work of art is on the market right now, priced at $2,495,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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underwater photography by christy lee rogers evokes the beauty of baroque paintings


the photography series re-examines the artistic medium through the relationship between movement, color, water and light.

The post underwater photography by christy lee rogers evokes the beauty of baroque paintings appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Tenant Organizing is Picking up Steam in Rochester

(Photo by Doug Kerr)

This past February, Elizabeth McGriff, a resident of Rochester, New York, moved back into her home at 618 Cedarwood Terrace. It was no small act, following a foreclosure local housing activists deemed unjust, prompting more than five years of bank negotiations, eviction blockades, rallies, acts of civil disobedience, prayer services, lockouts and a “live-in,” in which McGriff and others moved back into the house after sheriff’s deputies removed her belongings.

The actions were led by Take Back the Land Rochester, a housing organization aiming to take bank-controlled land and return it to the community in the form of community land trusts — specialized nonprofit organizations that take ownership of land on behalf of a community, often with the purpose of making it available for affordable housing or commercial space.

After the successful protest surrounding McGriff’s home, which MidFirst Bank ultimately sold back to her, she transferred ownership to the City Roots Community Land Trust.

City Roots Community Land Trust was founded in 2016 to permanently preserve housing affordability in Rochester through a model for community owned and managed land. At 618 Cedarwood Terrace, McGriff maintains homeownership and rents the land from the trust, which in turn ensures the home will remain at an affordable price when it is sold.

The work of the trust is a sign of shifting tides around housing advocacy in Rochester, according to Joe Di Fiore, board president of City Roots. A postindustrial city along the southern shore of Lake Ontario, Rochester ranks as the fifth-poorest city among the top 75 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. In 2017, housing court issued 3,510 eviction warrants in Rochester. And with roughly 65 percent of residents renting, more than 50 percent of Rochester residents pay more than 30 percent of their take-home income on housing.

Since the 2008-2009 financial crisis, Rochester has seen a dramatic uptick in housing advocacy. Take Back the Land led a number of eviction blockades — like the one for McGriff’s home — and last year, organizers launched a citywide tenants’ union, a homeless union and a union of senior citizens in subsidized housing.

Di Fiore has witnessed public sentiment change around the work. “When the eviction blockades first started happening, it was looked down upon,” he says. “Then, as more and more people were touched by the housing crash and foreclosure crisis … people started getting more sympathetic on and on-board with the cause. It’s empowered a lot of people.”

The formation of the land trust is part of a what Di Fiore calls a “multi-pronged effort for housing justice and advocacy.”

City Roots’ first year was dedicated to education and outreach among Rochester residents regarding the model. “The land trust is a new concept for people in general, but especially in Rochester,” Di Fiore notes, adding that only one community land trust was established prior in the 1990s and quickly went defunct.

Taking over the deed at McGriff’s home was considered their first major victory. Now, City Roots is determining how to move forward. They formed a partnership with Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, whose chief executive, Melissa Marquez, serves on the land trust’s board.

“We are exploring how we can provide permanent financing, mortgages, to homeowners who purchase a house where the land is owned by the land trust,” Marquez says.

With its high rent-burdened population, Rochester is part of a rising homelessness crisis across the state, especially in cities where residents do not have the same tenant protections offered in New York City. “We are not just thinking about affordable homeownership,” says Di Fiore. “We want to show the versatility of the model.”

In that vein, City Roots is working with a tenants union to buy out a rental complex and form a limited equity co-op, offering residents the opportunity to buy their apartments at an affordable price.

The trust also partnered with Saint Joseph’s House of Hospitality, a Catholic Worker community with a history of supporting Rochester’s homeless population. Over the last decade Saint Joseph’s House offered support to an encampment in the city as it faced several displacements, says James Murphy, a member of the Catholic Worker community.

This April, after an attempted removal of the encampment, “people mobilized,” says Murphy. “They formed a blockade with locked arms … there was a kind of showdown.” He believes the effort prompted the city to consider a more permanent location for the encampment.

Last month Rochester’s City Council approved a measure to convert a vacant lot into a designated encampment. If all goes according to plan, the land will ultimately turn over to the City Roots Community Land Trust, with Saint Joseph’s House continuing to provide support and services to the residents.

Trees will be planted on the site; the city also agreed to provide refuse pickup and allow pallets to set up tents. Murphy says they modeled the encampment off a sanctioned tent city in Seattle, though he added the involvement of a community land trust is unique. Approval by the City Council, he says, “gives a nod to the community land trust from the city, that they’re willing to transfer the land to them and they trust them.”

Besides the encampment, City Roots has three properties pending to be transferred into the trust and hopes to get funding this summer to purchase nine more over the next two years. An angel investor, Di Fiore adds, plans to loan the trust another $100,000 for additional properties.

“I feel really optimistic about how it will all turn out,” Di Fiore says of the encampment, but the sentiment also applies to what’s ahead. “We’ve used [the land trust] to stave off a home foreclosure, we’ve used it to set up a homeless encampment, we’re working with a tenants union,” he says. “It’s not just about fixing up or building a house.”

   

ziploc upcycles plastic into a line of wearable luxury items


beams couture treats ziploc plastic products as forgotten favorites in the bottom of the drawer, transforming them into luxury fashion items

The post ziploc upcycles plastic into a line of wearable luxury items appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Door-Knocking Scores a Victory for Affordable Housing in Baltimore

At a public meeting earlier this year with United Workers, where Baltimore Housing Commissioner Michael Braverman finally committed city funding to the city's affordable housing trust fund. (Credit: United Workers Media Team)

The door-to-door campaign paid off.

Or rather, the campaigns.

Late last Friday, a coalition of affordable housing advocates in Baltimore announced that they had reached an agreement with Mayor Catherine Pugh’s office and members of city council to allocate $20 million a year to the city’s affordable housing trust fund. The trust fund was created in 2016, after a campaign by many in the same coalition to get a question on the ballot establishing the fund. The measure was approved by 83 percent of voters.

A year and a half later, as Next City reported, the fund was still empty. As of March, the advocates — including members of United Workers and the Baltimore Housing Roundtable — had secured a verbal commitment from the city’s housing commissioner to put $2 million into the fund. But they were still going door to door, drumming up public support for an allocation ten times that amount. As the weeks went by with no further commitments from officials, the Baltimore Sun reported, the coalition began working on yet another campaign, this time pushing for a ballot question that would require the city to set aside 0.05 percent of its total property assessment for affordable housing.

Turning up the pressure helped bring the agreement to fruition, says Destiny Watford, a community organizer with United Workers and member of the Baltimore Housing Roundtable. As part of the agreement, the coalition agreed not to push for the property assessment measure on the November ballot.

“We didn’t know what would happen,” Watford says of the most recent ballot campaign. “We were just like, listen, if the city isn’t taking action, if their response to democracy and public outcry, if their response to thousands of voices that say that they want money in an affordable housing trust fund is silence, is to ignore us, to say that they’re with us publicly and then internally never do anything or put skin in the game, then we’re going to take action into our own hands. And we did.”

According to a press release from the campaign, the council is expected to support legislation creating small excise taxes on property transfers and deed recording that could generate around $13 million a year for the affordable housing trust fund. The mayor’s office agreed to allocate the rest, starting with $2 million in fiscal year 2020 and ramping up to $7 million a year by 2023. The agreement will be formalized with a memorandum of understanding and a press conference in the next month, according to the press release. Next City reached out to the mayor’s office for confirmation of the details, which were also reported by the Sun, but has not gotten a response.

Watford says the coalition is excited about the agreement because it’s hoping to build a model for future action in cooperation with city officials. But generations of Baltimoreans still don’t trust the city, she says, and the advocates still have their guard up.

“We’re just grabbing the chair to have a seat at the table …” she says. “We’re going to have to hold the city and ourselves accountable to make sure that this actually happens.”

Beyond cementing the agreement into law, coalition members are still pushing for a more direct allocation of money to a network of community land trusts in the area. Last March, the housing commissioner promised $100,000 to support the land trusts. It was a good start, says Lisa Hodges, project manager for the Westport Community Economic Development Corporation’s community land trust effort. But advocates were asking for $6 million.

Westport, which is also a member organization in the Baltimore Housing Roundtable, is one of three nonprofit development corporations trying to establish a regional land trust, Hodges says. It’s eyeing around 90 vacant properties in the neighborhood — where values are still “low-ish,” according to Hodges — and working on a model of shared equity in which the land trust would own the land and income-qualified residents would own the improvements. It’s targeting residents making between 30 percent and 80 percent of area median income, and Hodges says there are certain longtime residents of public housing who would make good candidates for homeownership under the community land trust model.

The equity share between the land trust and the homeowner after a home is sold is still being worked out, Hodges says. And the coalition is working with the city to acquire the first round of properties, which are vacant and tax-delinquent.

“We are really beating the bushes to get what we can so we can be self-determined in the way that the area is developed,” Hodges says.

The next step is for the city to not only formalize the agreement but to start distributing the money for projects, Hodges says.

“It’s one thing to say that you’ve allocated funds or you have access to funds, but if you can’t move the money quickly, it doesn’t make a difference,” she says. “Affordable housing developers are just like other housing developers: time is money.”

Watford says the only reason the campaigns have been successful so far is that they’ve been entirely rooted in the communities that are suffering the most from a shortage of safe, quality, and affordable housing in Baltimore. Residents have gotten tired of their neighborhoods meeting one of two fates, she says: disinvestment and neglect, or redevelopment for the primary benefit of people who are wealthier than the current residents. The coalition is trying to find new ways for people in Baltimore’s poorest communities to set the terms of their own growth.

“What this comes back to is the power of the grassroots and the power of the people on the ground,” Watford says. “Just internalizing the fact that we are creative, we are strong, we have stories that need to be shared. We have power, and we can wield that.”

   

this is the most expressive robot we’ve ever seen


dubbed SEER: simulative emotional expression robot, the humanoid head was created by japanese artist takayuki todo

The post this is the most expressive robot we’ve ever seen appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

   

world’s first graphene jacket uses lightest, strongest, most conductive material


without adding a single gram of weight, vollebak's graphene jacket has superlative, almost magical benefits.

The post world’s first graphene jacket uses lightest, strongest, most conductive material appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 



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