Posts by Author: WowHauser

A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott

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A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott

A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott
A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott

This is a crowdfunding project, so if you want to see A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott become reality, you need to pledge to make it happen.

You might already read the Modernism in Metroland website (which has been around since 2011), you might have been on one of Joshua’s walking tours or you might just like the idea of the subject matter. Either way, A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land should be a great asset if you want to discover art deco, modernist and brutalist architecture ​in the suburbs of London.

A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott
A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott

Like the website, the book is inspired by John Betjeman’s much-loved Metro-Land from 1973, which is definitely something you really should see. In fact, you can buy it on DVD if you want to do that. But while the documentary picked out a few leading architectural lights strung together by the eloquent words and thoughts of Betjeman, the book offers a much wider scope.

It is pitched as a ‘pocket guide’ to the modernist buildings of the suburbs, covering nine London boroughs and two counties and including over 100 colour photographs. There will be a short description of each building as well as a map for each area to help you find the buildings you want to see. Perfect if you fancy going out one weekend to check out some stylish architecture.

Sold on the idea? If you are, then you might want to pledge. And like all these crowdfunding projects, there are different levels of support on offer.

A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott
A Guide to Modernism in Metro-Land by Joshua Abbott

If you just want the paperback of the book with your name in the back, then £15 gets you that. Beyond that, there are options for the book and a Modernism in Metroland tote bag, a first edition and a t-shirt, a first edition and one or more art prints of an image from the book, a book plus a walking tour with friends or if you want to go in at the top, a personalised leather-bound hardback book plus most of the other rewards on offer.

Whatever you go for, please do pledge if you can and make it a reality. The book is over a third of the way there, so a good start, but still a little way off there target.

Find out more at the Unbound website

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1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

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1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

One of these was up for sale as a development project back in 2014. If you missed out, check out this 1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3.

At first I thought it was the same house back on the market. But a closer look suggests that it is another property in this small 1968 modernist development, which goes by the name of Rocque Lane.

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

It’s a three-storey house in what’s described aa a ‘leafy’ cul-de-sac, with views over the nearby St Michael’s church. It’s also a house that looks pretty faithful to the original Greaves design both inside and out.

The outside is pure 1960s modernism, there is no getting away from that. The angles, the timber cladding, the windows, the terraces, you get the idea. And that 1960s theme continues inside.

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

Yes, some parts have been updated here and there, but the vast majority of this one is pretty much untouched. So exposed brick, full height windows, built-in storage, wood-clad walls and quite possibly an original kitchen, Although the latter is perhaps not the best selling point of this place. The bottom line is that with a few touches here and there, this one could be the ‘60s dream.

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

A good deal of living space too. That includes a ‘bright’, double aspect open plan reception room, that ‘spacious’ kitchen, five bedrooms, a study / sixth bedroom and two bathrooms.

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

You also get a walled garden for the outside space and if you don’t want the full-on outside experience, you can always take advantage of one of the three roof terraces. Finally, a double garage and additional off street parking is also part of the deal.

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3

That last one was under a million, so prices have obviously risen over the last four years. This one is up for £1,495,000.

Images and details courtesy of John Payne. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Thanks to Chris for the tip off!

1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in Blackheath, London SE3
1960s Walter Greaves modernist property in London SE3

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Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

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Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

Not the kind of house we tend to feature, but after the popularity of the Huf Haus raffle I thought I would flag up Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire, which is also being sold via a raffle, with tickets at just £5.

This is very much a period property, but perhaps not as ‘period’ as you might think at first glance. However, the basis of the place does go back some centuries.

It is said to have been built in 1568 as a private resident for the wealthy landowner John Werden. It stayed in that family until the late 18th century before falling into local farming ownership and eventually decline in the 20th century.

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

The property returned to private ownership in 2006 and underwent a considerable restoration, transforming into ‘an Elizabethan structure to survive future centuries’ according to the publicity.

if you like a period property, this should appeal. While much of the inside is a modern take on a country house, the structure itself remains rather grand and the internal finish is obviously as premium one. Plenty of land and outbuildings too. In fact, let’s look at what you do win.

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

Well, the house obviously, along with 50,000 cash, which might help with the running costs of the place. Standard stamp duty is also included.

That house is described as an Elizabethan hall with Victorian cottage, complete with bespoke furniture and fittings, five large bedrooms, two fireplaces for open fires, an oak library and study area, three living rooms, walk in pantry, laundry and utility room, two formal dining rooms, service from the kitchen by a pulley system Dumb Waiter, a music room with full size Schiedmayer grand piano and a downstairs cloakroom. So a lot of space.

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

There’s also a private walled garden to the Victorian cottage, Elizabethan gardens with formal parterre, a rose garden with bespoke gazebo and obelisks, stables with space for two stalls and tack room, tractor-mower and log store, outdoor kennels, a large pond teeming with wildlife and a small boat for fishing.

The images perhaps give the best impression of just what you get, not least when it comes to the amazing outside space of this one.

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

Note that if the target is not met, the prize will be substituted with a cash prize equal to the total of the fees received less transaction fees and the ‘promoter’s reasonable administrative costs’. Check the terms and conditions for more on that.

Hopefully it doesn’t come to that and someone actually wins this as their next home. Already the server has crashed due to demand, so there’s obviously no shortage if interest in a move to Cheshire.

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

Due to issues entering, you can register your name at the site for the house raffle to be informed if when the competition will be back online, which sounds like it will be very soon. Tickets are £5 each when it does go back live.

More background in this article in the Chester Chronicle or if you want to access the Burton Hall website and competition page, you will find that here.

Thanks to John for the tip off!

Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle
Elizabethan Burton Hall in Burton, Cheshire up for raffle

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1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

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1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

He is perhaps best known for the BKF Butterfly Armchair, but his architecture if worth shouting about too. This 1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain is a joy.

Thanks to both Birmingham 81 on Twitter and Vejes for pointing me in the direction pf this seemingly unspoilt house on the Spanish Costa Brava and not too far from Barcelona. It was and presumably still is a hot tourist location too.

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

So the location is a winner, what about the house? Well, that’s an impressive piece of design too. The agent listing is incredibly factual and with little detail, so I will pick out what I can from the images.

First up, what a bold piece of domestic architecture. The concrete and curves greet you, but there is more to the design than that. More living space is found below, blending effortlessly into the rocks and stone that eventually lead to the sea. Yes, this is on the coast. Another plus point there, with stunning views through the full height glazing or from the expansive terraces outside the property.

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

Those curves continue once inside the house, creating a rather interesting ceiling space. In fact, once inside, you get a feel for this one, which is very much a Spanish villa, but mixed in with 1970s modernism.

So open spaces, tiled floors and a general white finish throughout, but with details such as the ceilings and windows, as well as untouched 1970s details. The kitchen is a survivor from the original era, along with the bathrooms plus a number of the internal fixtures and fittings. Not quite a time capsule, but very faithful to the design of the architect back in there day.

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

Quite a substantial living space too. A plot of 3,100 sq. metres and living space covering around 767 sq. metres. That space breaks down as a porch, dining room, lounge, ‘studio’, a kitchen with eating area, seven bedrooms (so ideal for family and friends calling round), five shower rooms, one washroom, a dressing room, two store rooms and a garage with an additional store room.

This one sells itself as much for the outside as the inside, with the garden containing a swimming pool and those lovely terraces to the front too. Imagine waking up to that each morning. The overhead shot hints at this place being fairly hidden away too, but with a road easily accessible from the house.

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

It’s a huge house in a wonderful location and as such, this doesn’t come cheap. Especially when you slip in the architect’s pedigree too. €5,800,000 if you want to move into this one.

Images and details courtesy of Finques Frigola. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain
1970s Antoni Bonet Castellana modernist property in Calella, Spain

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1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

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1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

At first glance you might think this 1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London is something of a time capsule. It isn’t, but plenty of originality is still in place decades on.

You will find it in Shirley and specifically on Orchard Rise, described as ‘one of the most sought-after roads in this residential area’. I don’t know the area, so I’ll have to take the agent’s word on that. If you know any different, do let me know.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

It is quite a remarkable place too. As I said, it does look like a house lost in time when you see the exterior and when you see some of the inner details too. We moan all too often about people ripping out period details and replacing them with bland modern finishes. This is an example of just why that tends to be a bad idea.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

It isn’t perfect and some rooms could probably be reworked. But we are talking tweaks. This house has so much going for it and so much period character from the front door onwards. Yes, that door with ‘Solstice’ emblazoned on it is the original one.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

Also original are the kitchen units, the Crittall metal windows, the handrail on the stairs, recesses in the walls for display, a fireplace or two and some door handles. Details to be treasured. Oh and this is also quite a sizeable house too with plenty of garden, which is pretty much the cherry on top.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

The accommodation on the ground floor starts with the entrance hall and goes on to include the kitchen with those original units (though some have been replaced), a dining room and the living room.

Hold on to that original handrail and take yourself upstairs to the first floor with four bedrooms, a WC and the family bathroom. The main bedroom also features those display recesses in the wall, a wonderful fireplace and what the agent calls a ‘playful use’ of differing ceiling heights.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

That’s not quite all as more stairs take you up to the roof terrace, which has been recently resurfaced and offers views of some distance, right up to Canary Wharf. Its original use was for the architect owner to watch the stars, so if you have a love of space, you can always follow in his footsteps.

As we said, plenty of garden too, mainly lawn with a variety of beds and shrubs, as well as a small playhouse built by architect Gubby for his children. Around a third of an acre all told. Finally there is a double garage and a short drive for more parking space.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

If this is your dream home it is just up for sale for £845,000.

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London
1930s Sydney Gubby art deco property in Croydon, Great London

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Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi

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Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi

Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi

The Modernist Estates book proved extremely popular a couple of years back, so I expect there will be a lot of interest in the upcoming The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi.

The Barbican, designed by Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, is now Grade II listed, and is one of the world’s most well-known examples of brutalist architecture. Its three towers – Cromwell, Shakespeare and Lauderdale – are among London’s tallest residential spaces and the estate is a modern-day landmark.

The book, published by Batsford and covering 284 pages, is described as a celebration marking the 50th anniversary of this brutalist icon. It looks at the design of the individual flats as well as its status as a piece of architecture. Author and designer Stefi Orazi has interviewed residents past and present, giving an insight into how life on the estate has changed over the decades.

Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi

Illustrations aplenty of course, with newly commissioned photography by Christoffer Rudquist, along with a comprehensive guide to the estate that will show in detail each of the 100 different flat types, including new drawings of the flats as well as the original plans and maps.

The book also includes texts by leading architects and design critics, including John Allan of Avanti Architects on the unique building materials and fittings of the flats, and Charles Holland of Charles Holland Architects (and FAT co-founder) on the home and how the concrete towers have become such a significant part of Britain’s domestic and architectural history.

Yes, I’m excited to see a copy too. If you want to pre-order, you can do that right now, with the book expected on 4th October 2018, priced at £31.30.

Find out more about the book at the Amazon website

Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi
Coming soon: The Barbican Estate by Stefi Orazi

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1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

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1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

Thanks again to Max for letting us know about this 1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland.

The house is rather intriguing, but sadly I don’t know a great deal about its past or indeed, the man behind it.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

From what I have read, the German architect was a convert to modernism, designing a number of buildings in the early 20th century, not notably the Teatro San Materno in Ascona, Switzerland. That buildings dates back to 1928, with this one following in the same location in 1934.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

That location is rather stunning too, looking out over Lake Maggiore. As you can see from the photos, this is the view you want to wake up to each and every morning. The hills, the greenery, the lake and the blue sky. Very special.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

As for the house, that’s a modernist / art deco affair as far as I can see. Pitched as a Bauhaus villa, it seems to have a few more curves than you would expect from that kind of place, but we are definitely looking at modernism from the 1930s.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

I’m not sure the exterior of this single-storey house is necessarily its ‘calling card’. This one sells itself from the inside. It doesn’t look to have changed very much. It is a listed monument and perhaps someone has carried out a particularly faithful renovation. But I get the feeling it has just been well maintained.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

Check out the wooden floor, the shelving, the wonderful doorway that frames the views from the house and the fireplace. It’s just frustrating that we don’t get the full tour in photos. There’s also a video on the listing which again, only covers a part of the house. Yes, the views are magnificent, but I would love to know if the rest of the house is as faithful as the main reception.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

It does have more space than you think, with the interior covering around 393 sq. metres and containing seven bedrooms and four bathrooms. There is also a sizeable terrace to take in the scenery, a plot of around 2,273 sq. metres and garages too, from which you can easily access the house.

1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland
1930s Carl Weidemyer-designed Bauhaus villa in Ascona, Switzerland

That’s pretty much all I know. Well, I know one other thing, which is the price, roughly converting to around £4,547,471 at today’s rates. That’s right, listed buildings in lakeside locations in Switzerland don’t come cheap.

Images and details courtesy of Wetag Consulting. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

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Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

How often do you see something exciting for a bathroom? not often I’d guess. So these amazing Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks by Olympia Ceramica are a welcome sight.

They are pretty amazing too. If you are anything like me, you love your vinyl and the players that spin it. I’ve got numerous players in various states of repair, but it’s fair to say that I have never thought of having one in the bathroom. Water and record players are not a good mix.

However these aren’t actually record players. The vinyl range, designed by artistic director Gianluca Paludi, is a set of bathroom / sink units inspired by the DJ decks and consoles of the 1970s. As a piece of theatre for the bathroom, it really is ‘job done’.

Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

Not just novelty though. Although that novelty plays a big role in its appeal. Take your pick from a range of sizes and colours, each one with a wooden base and recessed sink basin with the ‘vinyl’ at the bottom.

The arm and stylus combines to make the tap and the volume controls actually control type water flow and temperature. It is incredibly clever design.

Other accessories are available, including an LED mirror that looks like an audio equaliser, but at the end of the day, it really lacks the music. Well actually it doesn’t.

Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

That problem has been dealt with by built-in bluetooth speakers, so you can listen to your favourite tunes whilst doing your bathroom essentials. A lovely finishing touch.

Before you rush out to order any of the Vinyl bathroom units, a word of warning. They aren’t actually available just yet. These have been shown off by Olympia Ceramica, but have yet to get a formal release date and price. Which means you have time to save up, as these will almost certainly not be cheap. But do keep an eye on the retailer’s site for those all-important selling details.

Olympia Ceramica website

Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks
Vinyl bathroom units inspired by DJ decks

Via Design Milk

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1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

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1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

Sadly, there isn’t much about the past available online, but that doesn’t detract from the beauty of this 1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

Modern movement, international style, art deco…take your pick really. But we are going for the first of those labels. You can opt for what you like. It isn’t too important.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

What is important is the architecture itself, which is absolutely stunning. Dating back to 1936, the architect owner has done quite a job bringing this back to its best. But that owner has done more than just give the white exterior a lick of paint.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

According to the agent, the owner has both renovated and expanded the property. The expansion is likely to be at the rear of the property, but with the exception of the open space leading to the pool, everything looks very much in keeping with the original build. In reality, the the extension takes in the space beyond the kitchen and creates an area upstairs that houses the master bedroom. All done very well.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

The interior finish, overall, is very much of the 21st century rather than the early 20th century. To be fair, a renovated property of this period will go down one of two roads. Its either an attempt to maintain and restore the original property or it’s a case of creating a modern-era family home. We are looking at the latter here.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

But I’m not going to criticise. I love that curved stairway, the windows are stunning and the finishes are generally leaning towards the minimal. The furnishings obviously do not stay when the owner leaves. Yes, the built-ins are modern, but that’s pretty much what you would expect. Not one for the purists, but personally I don’t mind it at all.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

The living space covers 4,134 sq. ft. in total, including four bedrooms, four bathrooms and that extended and fairly open reception space downstairs. Love the office area off the (presumably) master bedroom suite. Happily work there each and every day.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

As I mentioned above, the expanded area of the house offers up a wall of glass overlooking the pool area beyond as well as some garden / entertaining space. A couple of garages are also built into the house.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

A rather stunning property and yours for something in the region of $1,299,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA
1930s modern movement property in Dallas, Texas, USA

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1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

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1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

And now for something completely different. It is fair to say that I’ve never seen anything quite like the 1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3, which is on the market for the very first time and in remarkably original condition.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Described by the agent as ‘one of the great post-war modern houses in London’, Housden House was designed and built by architect Brian Housden as his family home between 1963 and 1965.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Fast forward to 2014 and this house also, quite rightly, picked up a grade II listing. Historic England described Housden House as representing a ‘completely unique piece of architectural vision and ingenuity that syntheses [sic] a great wealth of influences and ideas and is executed with an intensity and conviction that is entirely personal’.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Those ‘influences’ are based around Housden’s love and understanding of European modernism, with the house taking inspiration from the likes of the Rietveld Schroder House in Utrecht and Pierre Chareau’s Maison de Verre in Paris.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

So that’s the background, now onto the house itself, which is set back from the street behind a recessed parking space and sunken patio and with a frontage that’s a mix of concrete and glass bricks at the front and pretty much completely glazed with glass bricks at the rear. The latter meaning lights floods the inside of the house at pretty much every level.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Enter into a ‘short’ hall and access the first of two living spaces, which accesses a large west-facing balcony that takes in the heath. A ‘dramatic’ void space takes up one side of the room, dropping to the lower level via a concrete staircase. Note that the supporting balustrade is capped with a pink-toned marble too.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

The lower-ground floor hosts the main living areas, made up of a largely open-plan space with access to the patio garden. The focal point of the room is a sunken dining area with bespoke circular dining table, while the floor is laid with mosaic tiles. The room can be partitioned by colourful curtains that ‘weave through the room’ on ceiling-mounted tracks. The kitchen is at the front of this space, an extending beneath the car space above, with doors to the sunken courtyard.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

A concrete staircase takes you to the first floor and two bedrooms. The master bedroom is described by the agent as ‘the real showpiece of the house’, with a ‘soaring’ ceiling and a full wall of glass bricks punctured with ‘deliberately placed’ windows with more views of the heath. Also present is an open bathroom in the corner of the room.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Head up another floor for two further bedrooms, one on the first floor and another a half level above and both with open bathrooms. Rounding things off is a mezzanine storage level over the hall space with colourful sliding doors and accessed by a fixed steel ladder, plus a fourth bedroom / study on the ground floor, adjacent to the entrance hall.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

Words can only say so much, but in this case the imagery really tells the story and showcases the all-important details that really sell this property. Check them out here and check out additional shots on the agent’s website.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

If all of that appeals to your eye, you will need to check that it also works with your bank balance. £3,250,000 is the asking price of this one.

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Also worth pointing out that there is an interview with Brian Housden’s daughters at the agent’s site too. You can read that here.

1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3
1960s Brian Housden-designed Housden House in London NW3

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