Posts by Author: WowHauser

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

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New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

Ever wondered where architects spend their time at the end of the day? Think no more, as a new book has it covered. Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

Not every architect obviously. That would be ridiculous and impractical. But Michael Webb has pulled together the homes of 30 leading architects, including Norman Foster, Thom Mayne, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

As I have said before on these pages, when architects’s houses come up for sale, you just know they are going to be interesting. They are designing something for themselves, there is no discussion with a client – they know exactly what they want. And the end result isn’t just a home, it’s a ‘calling card’ for the architect and his or her work.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

In this 304-page book by Thames and Hudson, the chosen architects talk about those houses they designed for themselves over the past decade, as well as what inspired them, the constraints and how their concepts took shape.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb

Michael Webb explores the creative process and traces the influence of architects’ houses over the past two hundred years, from Jefferson’s Monticello to the creations of Charles and Ray Eames, Toyo Ito, and Frank Gehry.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects Houses by Michael Webb

Texts, sketches, and plans illustrate the points made, showing a range of houses that differ widely, in size, material, character, and location, from the frugal and modest to the most adventurous of builds.

New book: Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb
New book: Architects Houses by Michael Webb

But according to the author, each one asks a question: ‘How can a house enrich lives and its natural surroundings?’

To find out the answer, you might have to pick up as copy. You can pre-order Architects’ Houses by Michael Webb now ahead of its 5th July 2018 release date, with the hardback book priced at £23.40.

Find out more at the Amazon website

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Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

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Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

If you don’t want to commit to buying, you can always rent an apartment in the brutalist Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire.

Not just one apartment either. You can rental from a selection of apartments via developer Urban Splash, which vary in price depending on the specification you opt for.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Known originally as ‘streets in the sky’, Park Hill was once a self-contained high rise village, developed between 1957 and 1962, working to a Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith design. Its aim was to recreate the streets it replaced in a new, futuristic development. This grade II* listed building and Sheffield landmark even had the old milk float travelling down its wide ‘streets’.

However, like many other large and ambitious social housing schemes, Park Hill suffered over the years from a lack of care and attention and the once desirable development became anything but that as the decades passed.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

A lot has changed in the last few years though. Urban Splash took on this masterpiece of brutalism, working architects Studio Egret West, Hawkins Brown and Grant Associates to bring it into the 21st century and make it as desirable now as it was back in the early 1960s.

The idea was to renovate all the apartments and bring back the ‘high street’ of businesses and shops too. This was would be done over a period of time, gradually redeveloping all the ‘ranges’ (there are four) and bring them back into full use.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Admittedly the idea of living in a place like Park Hill isn’t for everyone, but there has been a lot of interest in the building so far and a lot of the apartments have been snapped up to buy in the past few years. But if you don’t want to buy, you can opt for a rental here too.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

As I said, there are various apartments at different price points, with the images here being of the show apartment. So basically check out the Urban Splash site for the specifics of each one available.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

But as a general guide, you are looking at duplex apartments, (two storeys) with a dual aspect (windows front and back), colourful anodised aluminium panels to the exterior (replicating the coloured bricks of the original façade), aluminium-framed floor-to-ceiling glazing, engineered oak flooring and exposed concrete within to highlight its Brutalist heritage.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

There is also a balcony too, plus a fitted kitchen, secure entry, CCTV to all points of access as well as up to two bedrooms, a bathroom and the main living area.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Dressed well, as the photos show, these places really can look stunning. A nice mix of the modern and its brutalist past, which certainly isn’t forgotten. After all, this is Park Hill, how could it her forgotten? Just a glance at the building transports you back to the 1960s.

Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Brutalist rental: Apartment in the Park Hill development, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

If you want to have a look, you can do just that by contacting the agent. Prices are from £640 through to £875 per month.

Images and details courtesy of Urban Splash. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

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1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

This one is a stunner. If you fancy relocating to France, check out this super-stylish 1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

There is nothing I don’t love about this one, which is pretty much a lesson in renovation. Yes, it does look to have been renovated rather than being a time capsule from the 1970s.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

I don’t have an architect’s name, but it was designed for his or her own occupation. It was also someone very skilled and an architect not afraid to be bold. An interesting angular frame and one with full height glazing, lovely flowing space within, a design that encourages outside/inside living and so many period touches in this 1971 build.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

The wood cladding obviously, period built-ins, an original staircase, a bathroom that looks to have been barely touched and a kitchen that looks to be from the era too.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

Many subtle updates, but all within the original 1970s shell and helped along by a nice choice in vintage furnishings. Character intact, but the living space perfect for the modern-day family.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

There is around 340 sq. metres of living space, with the house surrounded in part by a terrace and with gardens beyond that.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

Head in and you will find a large entrance area, leading to a living room that’s equally spacious, as well as bright thanks to all of that glazing. A kitchen too, described as ‘functional’ by the agent, but better than a lot I see.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

On the right hand side of the entrance there are two staircases lead other levels. Go up and you will find what is described as a ‘beautiful room’, which is a bedroom with en-suite bathroom overlooking the living room. There’s also a toilet, a bathroom and four other rooms, each with a ‘water point’ (oh the joy of using a translation, I have no idea what that means, but I would guess at sink).

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

The other staircase leads down to a part originally dedicated to the offices of the architect who designed this house and is now just a general office area with views of the living room, along with three bedrooms, a studio and further corridor space.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

This same level also has access to a large basement with plenty of storage space, a home theatre and a ‘technical room’ with heat pumps.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

So more room than you might think within this one and coupled with a great location, which is just a matter of miles from the centre of Paris, makes it a very desirable property.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

It also means it doesn’t come cheap. This one is on the market for €1,785,000.

Imaged and details courtesy of Espaces Atypiques. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

If you want to see more amazing houses in France, check out our top 30 most popular modernist finds.

1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France
1970s modernist property in Bourg-la-Reine, near Paris, France

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1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

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1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Not as stylised as some, but this 1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire has originality as a selling point.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Well, almost. There is one addition that probably needs to be addressed, but beyond that, this place is incredibly faithful to the 1930s. Work needed, but a great starting point to have.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Potential is the appeal here and really you have to look beyond the finish. It looks like as lot of the changes to this one were done in the 1950s and 1960s, but most look to be cosmetic. You do wonder if the original fireplaces are sat behind those electric ones.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

But what I know for sure is that the structure of this place is original, the windows, the front door, the internal doors and perhaps even that wall of kitchen storage cabinets too. It just needs a clearout, some redecoration and some appropriate design in place within.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Well, one other thing too. At some point a conservatory was added and it really doesn’t look in keeping with the original house. The agent describes this as having ‘superb scope for extension’ and in light of the plot, which is about half an acre, they are probably right if you want to. But personally I would remove that conservatory and if you want more space, think about an extension more in keeping with the original architecture.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Not that there’s a lack of space right now. This is a good-sized house, with around 1,705 sq. ft. to play with.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Walk in through the front door and you are greeted by the reception hall with exposed wood flooring, leading to the lounge with curved bay window and two side-aspect windows. There’s also a dining room, which connects to that conservatory.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

Also on this floor is the kitchen with the full height built-in cupboards and drawers, a lobby / utility room, a walk-in larder and cloakroom / WC.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

On the landing is a window and glazed door to the balcony overlooking the front of property. Beyond that are four bedrooms and the family bathroom.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

A good sized plot, it covers half an acre and includes a driveway leading to a single garage with power and light, plus an adjoining car port and store as well as a summer house. The garden is predominantly laid to lawn with mature trees, shrubs and bushes.

If you see potential here, the house is up for £635,000.

Images and details courtesy of Paul Jeffreys. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire
1930s art deco-style property in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire

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1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

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1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

If I’m honest, this one is all about the exterior for me. But this 1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA does have a lot to offer as a family home too.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

However, the structure of this place is the thing that caught my eye and I would guess, the thing that caught yours too.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

Dating back to 1938, it has that art deco / moderne vibe going on, with the exaggerated finish, not least the curves and lines, still intact and still turning heads. You could imagine a time capsule behind that front door, although the presence of grey windows gives the game away a little.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

Yes, this is a renovation and a substantial one as well. In fact, there is very little obviously from the original era inside this place. But some things do survive.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

The exterior has the angles and the curves, so the inside space has them too. There’s also an ‘original style’ bathroom upstairs too. However, those are the exceptions, with the majority of the inside space really screaming ‘modern era’ and ‘luxury’. Money has obviously been spent on updating this one.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

But that’s also the issue in some ways for fans of the era. Original features are key to selling art deco properties, so the finish here might put off a few potential buyers. It might also bring a few in. Swings and roundabouts.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

2,006 sq. ft. of space in total, which includes a large living room with ‘grand’ fireplace and large corner windows, a dining room that opens onto the yard and an updated kitchen that has all the amenities you would want and hope for.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

Upstairs there are two ‘generous’ bedrooms (one with a balcony), one further bedroom / den and two bathrooms, one of those the original one.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

Outside space too, which looks like fairly modest, but well organised and a good entertaining space, with some green at the front of the house and a garage integrated into it.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

If this one works for you, the asking price is $929,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA
1930s art deco property in Oakland, California, USA

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1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

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1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

Thanks to Catherine for tipping us off about this 1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire. And she does have good reason for doing so.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

This is actually her family home, one that is architect designed, although we sadly don’t have the name of the architect concerned. But we do know that it dates from the 1960s and has a midcentury modern look and feel about it.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

The exterior is certainly a selling point, very much of its era, even if it has been updated or restored, It’s a similar story inside too.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

Full height windows and open plan living is definitely what we would like to see in here and there are other original bits and pieces present at a glance. But overall, the house has been updated / renovated and what looks like to a high standard judging by the images.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

The ‘period’ has been put back in with the vintage and retro furnishings dotted about this place. It could probably take more too, should you want to go for the full-on MCM look throughout this place. A 1960s sofa, a George Nelson clock, a vintage mirror, maybe even an Eames reissue. You get the idea. This is a great canvas for creating a midcentury modern home.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

As for space, that is all over a single floor and kicks off with an inner hallway with full length windows, leading to there second bedroom with fitted wardrobes, then onto the large, open living room with fireplace. That leads onto the dining room and the rather stylish kitchen area. Off that kitchen is a utility room with storage and of course, those utilities.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

A further inner hallways leads onto bathroom and the master bedroom, again with fitted wardrobes and windows to the front.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

A driveway outside leads to a single garage and elsewhere you will find a private rear garden screened by mature trees with lawns and decking.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

A lovely place and available with a guide price of £560,000.

Images and details courtesy of Ashtons. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire
1960s midcentury-style property in St Albans, Hertfordshire

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1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

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1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

The one downside to this 1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex is the lack of imagery currently available. I will update as and when I can.

Just five shots of a modernist gem from the late 1930s in fact and a house I know a lot of you will be interested in.

I believe this is number 1 Halsbury Close, which was built in 1938 for Frankel’s sister. According to the wonderful Modernism In Metroland, this house is made up of ‘two brick cubes’, one for a garage and one for the main house, with a cutaway corner that opens out onto the garden.

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

There is a number 2, also designed by Frankel for himself at the same time, but I’ll leave that one as it isn’t currently for sale and because this one is far more interesting. Although to be fair, any Frankel residential property is interesting as there aren’t many in the UK.

Rudolf Frankel fled to Britain from Germany via Romania in 1933, staying until 1950 and mainly taking on industrial designs rather than houses. So rarity value as well as architectural merit. This is a grade II-listed house.

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

It also has a lot of original appeal from what we can see and what the agent says. The agent says that the property has been ‘lovingly cared for by the current owners’ with e’very aspect both internally and externally taking you back in time to the late 1930s’. That is music to my ears and I’m sure yours too.

It’s just a shame we can’t see more. Of course, you can book a viewing if you are a serious buyer, but I’m holding out that more photos will appear online. This could be one of the best houses to go up for sale for some time.

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

In terms of its space, that is made up of a kitchen . breakfast room, dining room, an office, the main reception areas and an ‘exceptionally large garage’ converted into a spacious library with views of the landscaped gardens. So not completely original.

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

The first floor has what is described as a ‘stunning’ principal bedroom suite with dual aspect windows facing towards London, along with two further double bedrooms, a fourth bedroom and a family bathroom.

Huge landscaped gardens too, along with plenty of driveway parking outside.

1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex
1930s Rudolf Frankel modernist property in Stanmore, Middlesex

As I said, I will hopefully update this one as or when new images appear. But if you want to get up close now, speak to the agent and make sure you have around £1,500,000 available.

Images and details courtesy of Hamptons. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

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Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

This is an interesting one. It is a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA and up for sale. But there is more to this one than meets the eye.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

For one, the construction date of 1979. No, FLW didn’t rise from the grave to build a house in Michigan, this was a design dating back to 1938, but one that didn’t actually make it from the drawing board until four decades later.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Astrophysicist Fred Haddock was actually the third person to be offered this particular house design, taking it on in the 1970s in conjunction with Charles Montooth of Taliesin Associated Architects, an the architectural practice founded by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Not that you would know looking at the place. The attention to detail is breathtaking.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Sat in 10 acres of land, the house, which is on the market for the first time since construction, this Usonian-style home has a angular shape (originally designed to shed snow easily) and so much character within.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

The red concrete floors, the wood cladding, the exposed brick, all those built-in units and plenty of FLW design pieces, which may or may not be staying. One to check with the agent about.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Oh and there’s also that wonderful great room with its angled ceiling, full height glazing and sizeable brick fireplace. The master suite offers much of the same too, again with a brick fireplace, sloping / double height ceiling and full height glazing. Bedrooms rarely get more dramatic than this.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Of course, being a more recent build would suggest less maintenance required too, although you would have to double check that with a survey. From the images, this place looks in mint condition.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

A decent amount of living space too, despite it looking quite modest from the outside. The great room and dining room space dominates the place of course, but beyond that is the kitchen, the master bedroom with bathroom, a further bedroom (and a further bathroom), office space, a foyer, a laundry and utility area, and beyond the main house, a deck area, patio and a separate workshop and storage unit. There is also a garage, which has a further studio space built in, plus more storage areas. 1,300 sq. ft. of living space in total.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

All of that lovely land too. As I said earlier, 10 acres or so, made up of gardens, sloping lawns and ‘old-growth forest’ overlooking Honey Creek.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Very much off the radar until now, due in part to the owner wanting to keep the house out of the public eye, Haddock House is now on the market and looking for a second owner with around $1,200,000 to spare.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry please visit the website.

Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Haddock House in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

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Grand Designs: Most popular house finds from the TV show

WowHaus
Grand Designs: Most popular house finds from the TV show

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

It is always nice to see a house from the Grand Designs TV show go on the market, not least because each and every one is just so popular. Rather like the show itself. Bit some are more popular than others and here they are, the 10 most popular Grand Designs house finds on WowHaus.

As ever, the rundown is reverse order to add an element of suspense.

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

10. Piercy & Company-designed Kew House in Richmond Upon Thames

The house was featured back in 2014, with the build / conversion taking around two years in total. Tine well spent though as it was shortlisted for the RIBA house of the year award in 2015.

Quite a project too. Initially derelict buildings, it was reworked by friend of the owners Stuart Piercy, producing something very modern but at the same time a building that didn’t forget its past. Love the weathered steel cladding, the glazed block connecting the wings and of course, the indoor slide, which is top of my wish list if I ever take on a project.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

9. Four-bedroom modernist property in Bristol, Avon

This one dates all the way back to 2007, although it actually hit the market much later.

One of my favourites, perhaps because it has a touch of Californian modernism about it. Open plan living, an impressive double height wall of glass and plenty of luxury. Yes, there is a pool outside. A credit to architect Martin Pease.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

8. Low-energy modernist property in Clapham Park, London SW2

I always think of this one as having something of a Bauhaus influence. Although it is a million miles away from early century modernism at the same time.

It is because the design, the work of Mary Martin and Carl Turner from series 8, is just so minimal. No unnecessary detail and all the more stylish for it. It’s the kind of house that makes you want to have a huge clear out. The exterior, described as a ‘giant stack of glass cubes’ is quite something too.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

7. Dome House in Bowness, Cumbria

I think we all remember this one and the ‘journey’ that the designer and his wife undertook to get it built.

It was actually 2010 when this one was built, with the house since being part offered as a holiday let and being offered for sale in its entirety. A stunning setting and bold architecture that does sit well in its lakeside setting. As dramatic inside as it is on the outside and when the rain comes down (as it does a lot in this area), you can always have a dip in the indoor pool.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

6. The Inverted-Roof House in Amersham, Buckinghamshire

Think Amersham and you think of the iconic High & Over or the associated Sun Houses. But these days, you might also think of The Inverted-Roof House.

Ok, not quite as iconic as the others, but fondly remembered from the TV show, not least because of the man behind it, Tom Perry. It was very much a labour of love and a house that really was a long term project. In fact, the 2003 project went on the market just this year and still in need of finishing off, despite being lived in for a decade or so.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

5. Tree House property in Binstead, Isle of Wight

This one dates from 2010, transforming an old bungalow into something rather special.

That ‘special’ place was a house that blended into its woodland surroundings, but still with a ‘wow’ factor and flexible space within, right down to the artist’s studio and office in the extension. A house worthy of the ‘Grand Design’ name and one of Kevin McCloud’s Top Ten Grand Design Projects as well an award winning residence. Not bad for a conversion.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

4. Water Tower in Kennington, London SE1

This was ahead of the pack for months and years, but of late it has lost a bit of ground. But none of its appeal.

It was featured in the 100th Grand designs show on Channel 4 in 2012, a conversion of a derelict tower into the classic ‘old meets new’. But with more a contrast than most. You still have the original York stone staircase, the stunning exterior and a top floor space created from the old water tank, offering 360-degree views over London, with the modern glass cube adding in the contrast and the extra living space. An amazing transformation.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

3. Modernist property in Colgate, Horsham, West Sussex

Probably always to be known as the huge modernist house, this was the biggest house ever constructed on the show when it featured back in 2015.

Modernism in a grand scale, with internal space of around 5,533 sq. ft. and in the show there was debate about whether that amount of space would translate into a useable family home. You can make your own mind up on that, but for me it is quite a dramatic build with all that light and space, with some neat design touches and plenty of luxury, right down to the pool outside. Oh, still on the market too.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

2. The Water Works in Chesterfield, Derbyshire

Another fondly remembered property, and not just be me judging by its popularity.

Conversions seem to be something of a staple of Grand Designs, with this one being one of the earlier examples, dating back as far as 2002. A disused water works, it was converted into a modern family home without losing its original period details. Again, it is the mix of vintage and modern, with the former being more prominent in the finish. Saying that, the likes of underfloor heating and the cinema projector aren’t things you would spot in the photos. This is a contemporary living space that hasn’t lost its heritage.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

1. Modernist property in London NW1

And the winner is…well, this one. I know, it isn’t an obvious winner, but it has been consistently the most popular Grand Designs find over the years.

It dates back to around 2013, built by e house was built by Jonathan and Deborah Broom on ‘a scrap of land right in the gritty heart of north London’ both above and below ground. In fact, it extends around six metres underground.

A mix of living and work space, it has all the premium touches you would expect of a custom build, a couple of offices (which can be turned into bedrooms), its own nanny flat, substantial outside space and a leisure area, made up of a quarter Olympic length lap pool, gym and sauna. Luxury everywhere, but it did come at a price.

Find out more about the house

Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show
Grand Designs: The most popular house finds from the TV show

Of course, there are others too. Have a browse of the Grand Designs section, as new ones comes up all the time.

Archived editions of some of the shows can also be found at the All4 website.

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Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building, London NW3

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Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building, London NW3

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

I hate using the term ‘affordable’ because buying a house or apartment is never cheap. But this apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3 is more ‘affordable’ than most if the deal works for you.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

Thanks to Robin on Twitter for flagging this one up, which obviously isn’t as substantial as the penthouse apartment I mentioned a few weeks back, but it is a place in one of the more desirable modernist buildings in the capital, which I know is an end goal for a lot of you out there.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

You might already know that this is one of the most significant modern movement buildings in the UK and built to a design by Wells Coates in 1934. It was also the first block to be built mainly from reinforced concrete and of course, has a grade I listing.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

It was renovated back in 2004 and now looks stunning from the outside, although finishes will differ inside. But space does tend to be modest, especially when it comes to studio apartments.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

That is what you get here, a one-bedroom studio flat and judging by the photos, one that has been maintained and renovated very well. Some original and/or period details still here, although overall this has the kind of clean and contemporary finish you would expect of a modern-era apartment.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

As I said, a first floor apartment, one with an entrance lobby, studio room with door to balcony, a bathroom, wash room and kitchen. That private balcony if you want some fresh air, along with access to the communal garden.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

Fancy? This is the tricky (but interesting) bit. The apartment is available as part of a shared ownership scheme, knocking the initial price down to £200,000. But there are conditions.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

First off, you will need to be earning ‘a guidance income of £50,986’ and you will need access to savings of at least £4,000 to cover the cost of buying the apartment. A minimum 10 per cent deposit of around £20,000 too, so total approximate savings required of £24,000.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

One other thing to note, applicants must be earning under £90,000 to be eligible and you cannot apply if you are an existing homeowner, unless ‘you have found a buyer for your existing home and are deemed to be in need of housing by your local council’.

Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3
Apartment in 1930s Wells Coates-designed Isokon Building in London NW3

So a lot to digest there. But if you fit the criteria and want to follow in the footsteps of the likes of Agatha Christie, Marcel Breuer and Walter Gropius, do get in touch with the agent.

Images and details courtesy of Notting Hill Genesis. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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