Posts by Author: WowHauser

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

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Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

Not seen one of these for a while, so happy to flag up this maisonette in the 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

In fact it was back in 2016 when I last featured this building. Doesn’t time fly?

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

As you might recall, the Pioneer Centre dates back to 1935 and is now (quite rightly) a grade II* listed building. Built in the international style, it was also a building loved by Walter Gropius, who described it as ‘an oasis of glass in a desert of brick’. It probably still is.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

What it didn’t start off as was apartments and maisonettes. The building was actually a health centre of sorts, built for the ‘Peckham Experiment’, which was a study into health, observing families in a community setting and monitoring health through lifestyle factors. Very forward thinking in its day.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

But that day has been and gone and more recently the building has been converted into residential living space. Although one aspect of its healthy living aspirations is still in place. Just a hop and skip from your apartment is a large heated indoor swimming pool. A tennis court and gym is available for your own use too.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

All of that is a bonus, but what you are buying is somewhere to live, which in this case is a split level, end-of-row maisonette, with the swimming pool just outside the front door and a private terrace to the rear.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

Of course, original features don’t come into it too much in this case. The shell of the building of course, plus the internal supports and the walls of glazing. But overall, the interior is a clean, modern space, ready to be dressed as you see fit.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

In terms of the layout, the first floor is made up of the ‘generously proportioned’ open plan kitchen / living area, the former packed with all the high end appliances you would expect and the latter big enough to fit in both seating and a dining table if you want it.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

The first floor also has those original floor to ceiling windows running along an entire wall and with access to that terrace space too.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

Above that is what’s described as an ‘unusually large’ hallway / second reception room, with feature spiral staircase and built-in storage. There’s also the master bedroom, second bedroom and two bathrooms, one en-suite to the master.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

More storage if you need it, courtesy of two lockable storage areas which can be accessed from the front of the property, along with a concealed utility closet with space for a washer/dryer.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

Communal areas too. I’ve already mentioned the swimming pool, tennis court and gym, but there is also some grounds, a further communal garden area with lawn and seating and a vegetable patch. Finally, you also get a designated parking space.

The price is the same as the apartment from two years back, which is £750,000.

Images and details courtesy of Emoov. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15
Maisonette in 1930s Sir Owen Williams modernist Pioneer Centre in London SE15

 

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1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

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1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

Thanks to Nicole for pointing out this 1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

This really is the dream isn’t it? Well, it happens to be my dream. This is pretty much what we all expect of Scandinavian midcentury modern architecture. Sadly, not all houses of this era deliver, but the one here certainly does.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Amazingly, this one dates back as far as 1959, designed by Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfelt as his family residence. Great location too, which is apparently where Aalborg goes from city to country and with a position overlooking the city, but a hop and jump into the woods.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Has it been renovated? Almost certainly, but it is a rather light update. Someone has made the effort to keep this one pretty much as it was and as it should be, updating a few fixtures and fittings and looking after pretty much everything else.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

The architecture, exterior and layout look to be untouched, with the interior still benefitting from so many intact original features. The wood ceilings, the exposed brick, that lovely fireplace in the reception, the built-in units, original kitchen units, parquet flooring, original bathroom fittings, I really could go on and on. The photos say it best.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Of course, Scandi style being so hip right now helps, as does a scattering of midcentury and modernist design pieces throughout the house. But even allowing for that, the house Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel build really is a timeless piece of modernist design. Cool because it doesn’t try too hard. Less is definitely more in this case.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Head up the cobbled driveway and enter to discover the three large living rooms, which are pretty much the heart of the house,with so much open and flowing space. From those living rooms you get a view of the city and access to the sun terrace.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

The original kitchen that follows on is intact, offering space for preparing food and plenty of added space to hang out and eat.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

The bedrooms have been laid out for the adults and children, with the former having a large bedroom and en suite bathroom barely touched since the 1950s. A separate area hosts the two children’s rooms, which also has a private entrance as well as their own bathroom with shower. Pretty much an annexe.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

But that’s not quite all the space, with a staircase leading to a lower floor that’s barely used at present but does contain four rooms to do as you wish, from a home theatre or gym to a wine cellar or simply storage. It’s up to you.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Outside space too. Not exactly sure how much, but it does look a decent amount and it looks fairly private too from the images. But you probably want to check that out if you are planning on booking in for a viewing of this one.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

Before you plan that and your relocation to Denmark, you probably want to consider the price and your bank balance. This house looks to be on the market for 3,998,000Kr, which by my reckoning is around £481,000.

Images and details courtesy of Thorkild Kristensen. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark

 

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern house in Aalborg, Denmark

 

1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern property in Aalborg, Denmark
1950s Kjeld Dirckinck-Holmfel midcentury modern house in Aalborg, Denmark

 

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1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

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1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

Yes, it’s the return of an old favourite. The 1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA is on the market.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

I say return because this midcentury modern / modernist gem was first featured on the site back in 2016, selling pretty quickly afterwards (although that’s probably down to the house rather than me).

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

What has changed? Well, the price for one and a few other things, which I’ll cover as we go.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

But first off, for the uninitiated, here’s the rundown of the house. It sits on a 2.82 acre plot in the northwest section of East Hampton and dates back to 1968, the work of by ‘New York Five’ architect Charles Gwathmey and designed for graphic artist Joseph Sedacca.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

The architect had a free hand at creating just what he wanted and the result was this place, a futuristic, almost brutalist construction that still looks ahead of the game today.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

The sculptural extra is just stunning, but the drama doesn’t end at the front door. Check out the double height space, the glazing, the spiral staircase, the walls of glass and all that timber cladding both inside and out.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

Also still present is the oversized stucco chimney and built-in cabinetry, with the separate storage building still as it should be. This is still a very special house.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

A look around the 2016 version of the house and the 2018 take suggests very little change in terms of the structure. Of course not, Why would you?

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

The differences really come down to the fixtures and fittings. A couple of years back they were a little more in keeping with the original period of the house. Today they look a little more contemporary. Not too much but enough to notice.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

There’s another obvious difference too. The presence of an Airstream caravan. Yes, the Airstream in the picture (which didn’t look to be around last time) is part of the house now and is pretty much the third bedroom.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

There are three bedrooms in total, as well as three bathrooms and a living space of 1,200 sq. ft. in total, much of it taken up by the bright and spacious reception area.

1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA
1960s Charles Gwathmey Sedacca House in East Hampton, New York, USA

As I said earlier, an upgrade here and there, but the main one is the price. If you want to own Sedacca House now, then you’ll need to find around $2,500,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

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1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

Always nice to see a 1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex on the market.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

As you probably know, Frinton-On-Sea was something of a modernist testing ground back in the 1930s, with the likes of Wells Coates, Frederick Gibberd and Connell, Ward & Lucas producing designs for the Frinton Park Estate. But Oliver Hill is perhaps the name we most associate with the area and this house is one of his surviving builds.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

I’m not sure if it is quite up there with this one, but it is notably cheaper.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

The selling point for me is the architecture itself, which certainly looks well preserved from the outside. That half moon shape and the balcony area really do sell it. It looks like the design has survived without too much tampering over the decades, although the interior has been updated.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

Well, in a way. The layout looks like it is still faithful to Oliver Hill’s original layout. No extending or knocking through here to create the super-sized family kitchen. The design is as quirky and as curvy as you would expect.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

Original features? Hard to tell from the photos, but I would guess at least some of the doors, the circular windows and of course the balcony area (with sea views) to name a few details. But much of the house has been updated and the agency adds that it is need of refurbishment.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

The sad part for me is some of the double glazing additions. I can understand why the windows would have been done, but the double glazed doors really need reverting back to something more in keeping. Maybe the windows too if you have the money.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

Elsewhere, it’s a little plain and in places, a clash of styles too. It just needs someone to come in and bring it back to its best.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

As for the layout, you are first greeted by the hallway, which leads to a lounge / diner with parquet flooring and curves double window. Beyond that is the cloakroom, the kitchen with built-in larder cupboard and more of that parquet flooring, an inner lobby, shower room, utility and a study / garage area.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

Head upstairs and the first floor landing leads to the master bedroom (or sitting room) with double glazed door leading to the balcony, two further bedrooms, a bathroom and a separate WC.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

In terms of the outside space, there’s a concrete area for several vehicles leading to a garage at the front of the house, with an enclosed secluded garden with patio and lawn at the back.

A project for someone and on the market right now for £465,000.

Images and details courtesy of Sheen’s. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco house in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

1930s Oliver Hill art deco property in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex
1930s Oliver Hill art deco house in Frinton-On-Sea, Essex

 

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Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

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Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

I think this is the most bizarre house I have ever featured and if you want something a little different, the Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA is now on the market.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

Bizarre, but fascinating and interesting at the same time. I’ll try to make some sense of it.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

Bioscleave House (aka the Life-Span Extending Villa) is the work of avant-garde artist Madeline Gins and ‘Arakawa-proteges’ of the surrealist artist Marcel Duchamp. This is apparently the only house they designed and built ‘to test 50 years of research through this experimental, provocative laboratory’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The finished item is described as an ‘architectural body’ studio-house and a ‘stimulating environment for healthy living’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

There are actually two connected houses, the ‘back’ Bioscleave House and the ‘front’ original A-frame house. The back house is perhaps the most instantly eye-catching part of this place, said to be ‘a landscape of shifting forms’ in 52 colours and covering 2,700 sq. ft.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

But the front, which is connected by a new link, can’t be ignored. That’s an architecturally significant 1960s property covering 900 sq. ft. and designed by Harvard architect Carl Koch, who took inspiration from the Bauhaus movement to create a ‘simple, economical, modern’ summer cottage.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The front house has a living room with fireplace, two bedrooms, one and a half baths, full basement, oil heating and air conditioning, and floor-to-ceiling sliding doors and windows. Pretty straightforward.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The back house is a little more…challenging. It looks like some kind of lunar surface within or perhaps a beach? Maybe even a kid’s play area. Whatever it is, the impact is strong.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

There are more bedrooms here and an extra bathroom, but that’s not the space I’m really talking about. I’m looking at the ‘landing sites’ – large, high and open cubic volumes, as well was the numerous ‘metaphysical’ small slopes, hills, nooks and crannies that are designed to ‘stimulate’ the feet and with the overall ambition of being ‘a kind of kaleidoscopic laboratory or incubator for living well and longer’.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

The differences between the two spaces is intentional, a mix of the simple and the complex, with the intention of ‘living life as perpetual exercise’ in an environmental juxtaposition for puzzling about living life as art and art as living life-inside and out.

Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA
Madeline Gins-designed Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York, USA

 

I know, very confusing, but interesting nonetheless. If you want a more challenging living space, this work of art is on the market right now, priced at $2,495,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

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Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

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Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

If you are a fan of the great man, then probably want a copy of Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen from Phaidon.

Quite a thing too. Arriving next month through publisher Phaidon, this is a hefty, large-format book covering 336 pages and described as a ‘comprehensive monograph’ of one of the most influential designers of the post-war era.

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

If you want the official take on it via the publisher, here goes…

Verner Panton created enduring icons of pop culture, beloved the world over. He broke with the Scandinavian tradition of handcrafted teak-wood furniture to pioneer the use of plastic, fibreglass, synthetic fabrics, and industrial mass production, and this thoroughly researched and exhaustively illustrated book examines Panton’s ground-breaking approach to environments, systems, patterns and colour.

Panton’s oeuvre is a truly pioneering achievement, the wide-ranging influence of which is still felt today.

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

As you would expect of a large-format Phaidon publication, it is packed with imagery including hand-drawn sketches by Panton himself, personal photos, and advertisements from the official Panton archive, as well as the design pieces themselves.

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

Almost everything is featured here, from candlesticks and clocks to the seminal S Chair and Living Tower, as well as Panton-designed interiors, textiles, lighting, and furniture. It’s all organised thematically, with a comprehensive, illustrated chronology of Panton’s works, including many of the iconic designer’s unrealised projects.

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

Not cheap though. The official price tag of this weighty volume is £69.95. Saying that, Amazon is doing discounted pre-orders at the moment, with the book available there for £45.46. Whatever you pay, the book should be with you by 14th September, which is the official shelf date.

Find out more at the Amazon website

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen
Phaidon unveils Verner Panton by Ida Engholm and Anders Michelsen

 

Via Retro To Go

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Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

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Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

I don’t think the title Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17 really does this justice. It really needs to be seen to be believed.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

This is an ingenious and award winning property – the London Architecture Awards’ ‘House of the Year’ in 2013 in regard to the latter point and indeed the first one, as the way this house works is perhaps why it got the top prize.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

It is also a house of contrast, with a curvy, industrial steel exterior working its way around and under and even above a 19th century railway viaduct, hinting at nothing but more of the same industrial finish within.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

A workshop perhaps? Exposed concrete? Nothing could be further from the truth.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Once inside you will find a remarkable contrast, although there is some workspace here. But definitely nothing industrial.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

In fact, more substantial than you might think from the exterior shots too. You get around 1,600 sq. ft. of living space inside and more natural light than you would expect.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Everything about that interior appeals. The double height (at least) space, the curves, the wall of glass, the stairways (with traditional and spiral), the gallery overlooking the main reception and the bright, white finish throughout.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

The use of space is quite impressive too. Every inch has been carefully thought out, from the location of the kitchen to the library and child’s play area. So much here and none of it looking particularly cramped.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Oh and if you are worried about the noise – which is definitely something I would be worried about – that has been dealt with too. According to the agent, ‘slender steel foils’ collectively form a ‘protective acoustic shell’ around the whole house, so that the bedrooms and the open-plan areas are undisturbed by the sounds of the railway above.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

As for space, this is actually currently laid out as a family home and a photography studio, with communal areas at various levels beneath the three-storey atrium, with adjoining private rooms including two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a study. I suspect there are options to reconfigure if photography isn’t your full-time job or main hobby.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Hard to talk too much about this one when the photos really do the job so much better. Have a look at those, with even more at the agent’s site. They should give you an idea of how this place works in practical terms.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

It is on the market for £1,085,000 if you want something just a little different from the norm.

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17

 

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist house in London SE17

 

Undercurrent Architects modernist property in London SE17
Undercurrent Architects modernist house in London SE17

 

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Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

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Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

What does £85,000 get you in the UK? Not a lot. But this 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA is available for just that.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Of course, I don’t know the full story and crucially I don’t know Toledo at all, let alone this particular area. But if you are a fan of art deco, then this is definitely worth looking at. Well, if you are shopping for a house in Ohio.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Not a lot of detail offered by the agent, but from what I can see, the house needs work. Again, when I say that I say it as a positive and not a negative, as work often means originality still in place.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

That is the case here, but this is far from a time capsule. The exterior certainly has the look of one and that does seem to have been very well maintained over the years.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Inside, it looks to have been modernised, but mainly in terms of the finishes. The layout, the staircase and of course the windows all look right for this property and the kitchen units are certainly period. Although that period might be a little on from the 1930s. It’s hard to tell. Either way, the vintage kitchen works with the house.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Other rooms have a hint of the 1970s and 1980s about them, but again, it’s really about the finishes and the decor. Strip this out and you could bring it back to the period relatively easily I would guess (but do have a closer inspection and make up your own mind about that).

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Love that balcony area too (front and back), which seems to be surrounded by the original rails and the bathroom? That seems to have cover at least three different eras, but I love the blue wall around the window.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

Around 1,834 sq. ft. of living space with this one, which is over six rooms, including three bedrooms, the one bathroom, a large open reception and an eat-in kitchen.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA

You also get an attached garage, the balcony space I mentioned and what looks to be a sizeable basement space too. A good-sized plot too, which includes both decking and garden, as well as a garden shed. The agent also points out that the kitchen appliances are staying as well as the lawnmower (if that’s a deal breaker).

$115,000 is the guide, which is that £85,000 figure at today’s exchange rate. Probably the cheapest bit of art deco I’ve seen for sale.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco house in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco property in Toledo, Ohio, USA
Bargain spotting: 1930s art deco house in Toledo, Ohio, USA

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Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

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Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

There is a good reason why this is known as the Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA. Oh yes, it has just gone on the market too.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Also known as the Star Wars House by locals, Eye Of The Storm was the work of architect George Paul back in 1989 and according to Apartment Therapy, it was designed to replace the beach house of the architect’s parents after it was destroyed by Hurricane Hugo.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Not wishing the replacement to suffer the same fate, the house took on a radical design that’s both easy on the eye and tough on any extreme weather that might come this way. Hence the name.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

This space age gem is still a beach house, located on an island off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina and quite honestly, one of the most striking and eye-catching houses I have seen in a very long time.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

It really is all about the curves. The outside is pretty obvious, a thing of beauty, it also looks like a alien spaceship stopping amongst the more traditional builds around it. Not for everyone, but definitely for me.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Not just a pretty face either. This house is built from 600 tons of reinforced concrete, tough enough to deal with even the most extreme of weather fronts. Hopefully that aspect isn’t called upon too often but when it is, you should be safe within.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

For the rest of the time, enjoy the design, the indoor/ outdoor entertaining space (so many balcony areas here), the amazing views on offer here and when it gets a little chilly, an interior that mostly matches the boldness of the outside.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Not quite everywhere. Some of the rooms, not least the bedrooms, are a little more traditional than you might expect. But that’s no doubt down to personal taste. But there is plenty of drama elsewhere.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

None more so than the main reception area with its double height space, walls of glazing and that amazing staircase and balcony area. Rather like the future we were promised 30 or 40 years ago.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Love the fireplace too. Note that the architect used bricks rescued from the original beach house to create a fireplace with one chimney and two flues. This means it can work as both a fire on cool days inside and as a grill for outdoor barbecues on the porch when the weather picks up.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

As for space, well this one sits on half an acre looking out to the sea, with 4,047 sq. ft. of living space within, which includes three bedrooms, five bathrooms, kitchen, the dominant reception and much more. Check out the photos and details on the listing for the full breakdown.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

How much does it cost to be stormproof in South Carolina? In the case of this house, it will cost you in the region of $4,995,000.

Images and details courtesy of Zillow. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA
Eye Of The Storm modernist house on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, USA

Via Apartment Therapy

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1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

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1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

This is pitched as a renovation project, but personally I think this 1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia is pretty much perfect.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

Ok, that’s based on the photos here, which aren’t plentiful. But what I see is a wonderfully preserved midcentury modern build from the 1960s, which really just needs furnishing and tweaking.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

But that particular course of action might not be the one taken. According to the agent, this is one for ‘The Renovater, The Detonator or The Developer’. In other words, someone can do it up or just knock it down.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

Why knock it down? Well, that’s down to the land. As ever. This is on s plot of 980sq. metres of ‘near-level land’ and ‘one of the largest allotments left in the area’. I think that’s likely to be a developer’s dream and enough space for a large luxury home or a group of townhouses. Yes, things are much the same in Australia as the UK.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

But it doesn’t need to be like that if someone falls for this lovely piece of architecture. A fairly traditional brick build, it has that wonderful angled roof (and ceilings too), full height windows, exposed brick, plenty of wood finishes for both the fittings and the ceiling, a lovely staircase with gallery, double height space and so much character. It really would be a shame to lose all of that.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

The house also offers a good amount of living area too over three levels. Plenty of reception space, the original kitchen, a master bedroom, three more bedrooms and a family bathroom in the main house. But that’s not quite all.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

At the rear is a self-contained studio which is ‘very much in need of repairs’ and featuring a living room, bedroom, kitchen and bathroom. There is also a garage built into the main house too, as well as the land I mentioned before.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

Big thanks to Shane for flagging this up and hopefully someone will love the architecture more than the development opportunity. As for price, this is an auction property, with the guide pitching it at between $800,000 and $880,000. A quick conversion from Australian to UK currency puts that at between £451,000 and £496,000.

Images and details courtesy of Ray White at realestate.com.au. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia
1960s midcentury modern property in Bayswater, Victoria, Australia

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