Posts by Author: Next City

World Urban Forum 9, Day Six: Slum-Dwellers Improvise Solutions

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Monday, Feb. 12, our speakers talked about how slum-dwellers maintain their informal settlements in the absence of government assistance and the importance of building age-friendly cities.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day Six: Slum-Dwellers Improvise Solutions

 

World Urban Forum 9, Day Five: Informal Workers and LGBT Rights

A panel discusses ways to better integrate urban and rural spaces.

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Sunday, Feb. 11, our speakers talked about connecting architecture to the Agenda’s principles, building smart cities for all, and creating urban spaces that make LGBT residents feel welcome.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day Five: Informal Workers and LGBT Rights

 

World Urban Forum 9, Day Four: U.S. Mayors and Empowering Women

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Saturday, Feb. 10, our speakers talked about community-driven art and creating cities that are safe for women. Plus, four U.S. mayors and civic leaders joined us in the Mayor’s Corner.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day Four: U.S. Mayors and Empowering Women

 

World Urban Forum 9, Day Three: Architects, Advocates and Mayors from across the Globe

Members of the Consortium for Sustainable Urbanization discuss gateway portals to New York City.

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Friday, Feb. 9, our speakers talked about cities’ role in dismantling inequality, new ideas in flood adaptation, and how a city in Albania—“until recently, the North Korea of Europe”—is reinventing itself after the fall of communism.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day Three: Architects, Advocates and Mayors from across the Globe

 

World Urban Forum 9, Day Two: Art, Housing and Smart Cities for All

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for wide-ranging conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Thursday, Feb. 8, the topics discussed included how New Orleans can create more affordable housing in the face of resistance from the state, technological accessibility, and the discrimination faced by artists with disabilities.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day Two: Art, Housing and Smart Cities for All

 

World Urban Forum 9, Day One: Conservation, Children’s Cities and More

This week, planners, policymakers and urban practitioners from across the world are gathering in Kuala Lumpur for World Urban Forum 9. This story is part of Next City’s coverage of the Forum. For more stories, visit our World Urban Forum 9 page here.

Each day during World Urban Forum 9, Next City is inviting attendees to visit the World Stage for wide-ranging conversations about the principles enshrined in the New Urban Agenda. On Wednesday, Feb. 7, the topics discussed included how conservation can coexist with development in George Town, Malaysia; the importance of making cities accessible to older people and people with disabilities; and a tool to help cities prevent “resilience” from being just a buzzword.

Gallery: World Urban Forum 9, Day One: Conservation, Children’s Cities and More

 

The Best and Worst Urban Trends of 2016

(AP Photo/ Shakh Aivazov)

While 2016 is poised to go down as a tough year all around, there were some bright spots amid the losses. We had more real talk around urban design than ever before, from planners letting go of the rational to a design guide offering up the sage advice, “don’t be a dick.” And although the year brought stark reminders that racial inequality in the U.S. is alive, well and dangerous, 2016 also saw a number of new racial justice initiatives in cities, including the first U.S. memorial to lynching victims announced for Montgomery, Alabama. On the legislative level, cities are stepping up to promote equity in the form of paid leave, protections for gig workers and cutting ties with socially irresponsible banks

On the other end of the spectrum, the U.S. President elected this year will enter the White House without anyone who holds deep urban policy expertise in his cabinet, putting cities at a disadvantage and threatening the achievements of the last eight years. The mixed messages we have heard from Treasury appointee Steven Mnuchin and from HUD appointee Ben Carson do little to assuage those fears.

From the good to the bad to the downright perplexing, here’s our take on the most influential urban trends of 2016.

 

Next City’s 2016 Year in Review

Our features are made possible with generous support from The Ford Foundation.

 

Bike-Share Isn’t Just for Big Cities

Sponsored content from Zagster. Sponsored content policy

Bike-sharing should be for everyone — not just big cities. Yet when bike-shares first cropped up in the United States more than a decade ago, technological, financial and logistical demands confined them primarily to large metropolitan areas.

Smaller cities lacked the big budgets necessary to install sweeping systems full of depreciating assets. Nor did they have the finances to hire all the staff needed to operate and maintain bike-shares. So even were they able to implement small systems scaled to their needs, they still had no realistic way to pay for all the upkeep.

However, with technological innovations and new business models, smaller communities are breaking down barriers to entry and launching successful bike-sharing systems that are tailored to their needs and built within their means.

Join Zagster and the Shared-Use Mobility Center for an exclusive webinar, which will examine how smaller communities are making bikesharing work for them. Register to attend the webinar here.

“Zagster is focusing on bringing a solution that works for the rest of the country,” says CEO & Co-Founder Tim Ericson. “New York and Boston have a subway, but that doesn’t mean Albuquerque or Fort Wayne need to put in that sort of infrastructure. That’s where we fit in.”

As opposed to the expensive docking kiosks used in big-city programs, Zagster’s bikes come outfitted with built-in locking technology. And because the company manages all aspects of its programs — from technology and infrastructure, to maintenance and marketing — Zagster enables cities to deploy cost-effective programs tailored to their communities.

To further reduce the cost to cities — and taxpayers — Zagster also offers a unique private-public funding structure in which local businesses and organizations sponsor systems. In exchange for their support, sponsors get to be associated with a positive community development and — through branding on bikes and stations — enjoy the exposure of their brand riding around town.

“Zagster allows mid-sized cities like Fort Wayne the opportunity to have the amenities of major metropolitan areas without the cost and complexity of bigger systems like those in Chicago and New York,” says Kathryn Gentz, a member of Leadership Fort Wayne, the group instrumental in bringing bike-sharing to the Summit City.

It’s not just bike-loving organizations backing these programs either. Zagster’s sponsors range from Fortune 500 corporations to local mom and pops. So while Zagster’s partners have brought on board cycling advocacy organizations, health care nonprofits and universities, they’ve also signed up museums, breweries and even, in Lakeland, Florida, a church.

Zagster believes that strong communities build strong bike-shares. And to that end, the sponsorship model exemplifies civic engagement by allowing anyone and everyone in the community to be a stakeholder in the bike-share system.

“Everybody is looking to provide better transportation options,” says Ericson. “They’re always trying to compete with others in the state and so bike-sharing has become an expected amenity in urban environments throughout the world.”

Learn more about Zagster and the collaborative sponsorship model for cities in this webcast Making Bike Share Work Outside of the Big City on Tuesday, December 20, at 2 p.m.

 

With Global Agreements, Vision for Resilient Cities Sharpens

October started with the gathering of enough signatures for the Paris climate agreement to take effect in November, and the month is winding down with another positive sign for those advocating for more resilient cities, with the adoption of the New Urban Agenda at the UN’s Habitat III conference in Quito, Ecuador.

The first is a treaty among countries, negotiated in Paris last fall, that signals an intent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The latter is a nonbinding UN document intended to guide sustainable urban development in decades to come. Questions remain about inclusivity and implementation when it comes to the New Urban Agenda, but the agreement does acknowledge the risks of climate change and address mitigation and adaptation.

Many working on the challenges that cities face also see a connection between both agreements and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, a global agenda that sets targets on everything from poverty and hunger to sustainable cities and climate action.

Watch Next City’s Quito Dispatch below to hear experts and officials at Habitat III this week talk about preparing cities for the effects of climate change, and how urban planning and policy can answer the threats of rising temperatures and sea levels.

 



Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Architect Mahmood Fallahian

For Visit Our Website Please CLICK HERE

For Contact Us Please CLICK HERE