Posts by Author: n New Projects information at DesignCurialn

Ekklesia

How were you commissioned?:
The commissioners directly contacted us to develop the project one year in advance

Fallas festival

What was the brief from the client and how much were they involved?:
The brief was to develop an urban installation for Fallas festival. A festivity deeply conected with tradition, and in this context to develop a contemporary image to generate debate between traditional and contemporary.

Fellas Festival

How did your previous experience help you with this project?:
We already had six years experience in building this kind of installation for this Festival. However every year we try to develop the installation with a different material and push this material to its limits. Also our experience as architects helped us a lot.

Fallas festival

Can you explain the layout of the project:
It is an installation made with cardboard tubes with a metallic appearance atop a mosaic made of 96,000 wooden pieces. During the Fallas festival in Valencia, held every year, the ultimate goal for these installations is to be burned to celebrate the arrival of spring. In this context we built a structure entirely of cardboard and wood joints. The purpose was to investigate to what extent we could hold up this type of structure, and also to place in a traditional context a contemporary image to provoke the debate between tradition and modernity. The installation represented a temple where citizens can meet and realize the power they have to change things through debate and confrontation of ideas. Hence the title Ekklesia, an ancient Greek assembly that met once a year between elections to decide if someone was a regular offender they would banish him from the city for ten years. The facility was visitable and columns were screen printed with real political messages with critical messages of citizens, trying to highlight the emptiness of political discourse and the need to provide it with content to generate discussion and be owners of our future. The stage on which the installation was settled was a mosaic of 96,000 pieces based on designs of Nolla Mosaic, a traditional Valencian ceramic that was lost in the middle of 20th century. On the one hand its function was to highlight a lost heritage and to emphasise that any innovation in a traditional context should be based on a thorough knowledge of tradition. At the same time we also wanted it to be a participatory project and therefore the completion of the mosaic was made in different workshops with children at risk of social exclusion and various neighborhood associations.

Fallas Festival

What problems or challenges did you face?:
The timing for construction, we only had one week to build the installation on the street, and it had to be made entirely on the street piece by piece, so we depend a lot on timing and weather. We also made some models to see how material responded, but cardboard is always a surprise, depends on air humidity, on the side of the tube that has direct solar light, etc.. so the response of the material with a structure 12 m high was kind of surprise, it responded as a living being more than as a structure. 

Festival

What do you feel were the most unusual design elements of the project?:
There were two. The use of only cardboard to build such a big structure, and also the wooden mosaic of 96.000 pieces made with help of a lot of civil associations and schools for kids in risk of social exclusion.

Festival

How do you think this project is pushing design forward? What makes it special?:
The most important point is the context. The context is a city that celebrates a festival more than 150 years old, deeply related with tradition. So this kind of installation was a 180º turn to what people where expecting. So the main goal that was generating debate was accomplished.

Festival  

Suppliers Please provide details of product names and suppliers where possible.:
Authors: Miguel Arraiz García / David Moreno Terrón (pinkintruder)
Location: Valencia, Spain
Year: March 2015
Area: 144 sqm
Colaborators: ARAE Patrimonio, Asociacion Cultural Falla Cronista, Retales, Josep Martí, Barret Films, Led Visuals, Ignite, Valencia Vibrant, Choreoscope, Visorifashionart
Photography and video: Noel Arraiz
Client: A.C.F Nou Campanar
Cardboard supplier: ALPESA
Wood supplier: ALPISA

 

+tongtong transforms the Drake Devonshire Inn, Ontario

FX


Project Info

Designer: +tongtong

Architect: ERA Architects

Client: Drake Hotel Properties

Size: 1,010 sq m

Cost: Not disclosed

Duration: Two years


Words by Emily Martin

Images by Nikolas Koenig

The Drake Devonshire inn was previously a tired B&B until hotelier Jeff Stober enlisted design firm +tongtong to undertake a dramatic transformation. To the east of Toronto in the lakeside town of Wellington the now 11-room, and two-suite, boutique hotel uses the surrounding landscape to help radiate a back-to-nature ambience inside.

The dining space sits in a Douglas fir frame
The dining space sits in a Douglas fir frame

Perched over a meandering creek and a private waterfront, the hotel has spectacular and sweeping views of Lake Ontario. With the help of ERA Architects, a specialist in heritage conservation, the inn, a former 1880s' foundry, includes new architectural additions such as a barn-like pavilion, a dining hall in a Douglas fir frame, and the 'glass box' events space that overlooks a secluded patio at the edge of the creek with forest views. A new outdoors bar with glass roof, masonry chimney and double-sided fireplace, includes picnic tables and café-style furniture on a cedar-plank floor, with all spaces designed to 'enjoy the outdoors' year round and draw to the inside the breathtaking scenery.

+tongtong designed dining tables that incorporate strips of floorboard and Corian panel insets
+tongtong designed dining tables that incorporate strips of floorboard and Corian panel insets

The dining room space is of a cantilevered construction, jutting out over water to 'create a special moment over the mouth of the creek,' says Philips Evans, principal at ERA Architects.

'From this point, guests can appreciate the movement of the creek throughout the seasons against the striking views of Lake Ontario.' Inside, the ribbon of large windows frame the outside scenery, with +tongtong designing the tables that follow a theme of 'old and new', using floorboards and Corian insets on a painted steel frame for a utilitarian feel.

Throughout the design scheme, +tongtong has used a number of aesthetic cues taken from typical features found in farmhouses and cottages in south Ontario - including practical ad-hoc renovations using readily available building materials and mismatched furnishings.

'One of our goals was to balance the rational aspects of the architecture with contrasting colours and textures throughout the interior spaces,' says John Tong, creative director and designer, +tongtong. 'The outcome is a seemingly ad-hoc collection of controlled compositions and dynamic collisions.'

A large mural by Brooklyn art collective Faile sits in the newly built pavilion
A large mural by Brooklyn art collective Faile sits in the newly built pavilion

Furniture, fixtures and accessories are sourced from both local and international antique markets and vintage fairs, refurbished to sit with bespoke furniture, hand-turned lamps, virgin-wool blankets and accessories. The lobby features a heavy oak and black slate desk, a mix of custom and found display cabinetry and a vibrant mix of patterns and textures. Ornate decorative wall and floor tiles, floral wallpaper and exposed brick create a patchwork that is repeated throughout the design scheme.

Warmed by a working fireplace, the Living Room space, in the heart of the original building, is an intimate hub linking the restaurant and reception area to the Glass Box - which serves as a light-filled games room when not hosting events - and the guest rooms and suites upstairs.

Guest rooms fuse old and new by featuring mix of whitewashed floors, vintage and custom contemporary furniture with boldly patterned carpets, upholstery and schoolhouse lamps.

Custom-designed headboards, desks, armoires, farmhouse vanities, and articulating mirrors were designed by +tongtong to create a homely feel, with the so-called Owner's Suite on the second floor offering guests a panoramic lake view and a private outdoor deck.

Guest rooms are a mix of whitewash floors, vintage and bespoke contemporary furniture, and patterned carpets and upholstery.
Guest rooms are a mix of whitewash floors, vintage and bespoke contemporary furniture, and patterned carpets and upholstery

Contemporary art installations are throughout the property, both indoors and out, featuring the work of a number of local artists including Don Maynard and Jeremy Jansen. +tongtong says that the biggest challenge was creating a storytelling space to be embraced by both the local community and visitors from further afield.

'We didn't want to create an artificial space that took a film-set approach, imitating the rural vernacular,' says Tong. 'Local artists, performers, cooks, crafts people, service staff and residents needed to feel that this place reflects something of themselves, their values, while also being open to new ideas and perspectives of the larger international community.'

Suppliers

Furniture:
Design Within Reach
True Cut Cabinetry
Barlow Cabinetworks
West Elm
Nick Day Design

Lighting:
& Tradition
June Lighting Group
Lightoiler

Flooring:
Bauwerk Parquet
ege

Wall covering:
Sabine Hill
Benjamin Moore
Flavor Paper

 

MMMAR showroom

How were you commissioned?:
Directly from the Client

MMMAR showroom

What was the brief from the client and how much were they involved?:
The project was born from the need to regulate the extremely confusing internal routes. Clients were involved step by step in all the processes.

MMMAR showroom

How did your previous experience help you with this project?:
It helped a lot, it was like creating an exhibition.

MMMAR showroom

Can you explain the layout of the project:
From a fragmented space in which there were several laboratories of cutting, sewing and packaging of the leather, it has been obtained new environments with precise functions, some of which are interconnected both physically and visually.

MMMAR showroom

What do you feel were the most unusual design elements of the project?:
The central multi-cuttered wall.

MMMAR showroom

How do you think this project is pushing design forward? What makes it special?:
This environment has been modeled on the streets of the villages scattered in the Florentine Chianti (area where the company is based) that are never straight but offer glimpses and continuous changes of perspective. Each step conceals a discovery, a new angle, a projection, a recess, an entrance.

MMMAR showroom

- Architectural project and artistic direction: MSa - Marco Sorito Architect

- Detailed design and construction management: Raffaele Pivieri Engineer

- Photography: Itaca Freelance

 

The schuh fits for MRA

FX


Project Info

Client: schuh

Architect: MRA Architecture & Interior Design

Size: 215 m sq

Cost: Not disclosed

Duration: Four weeks


Words by Emily Martin

Images by Adrian Ruiz Martin

Established in 1981, schuh has grown to become a hugely successful omni-channel retailer and this year launched a new interior design concept at its store in the Bluewater shopping centre in Kent. Created by MRA Architecture & Interior Design the concept, dubbed the 'twentyFIFTEEN', will now be rolled out across schuh's new sites to communicate brand values of 'innovation, service and convenience'.

While developing the twentyFIFTEEN concept, MRA says it was first and foremost inspired by schuh as a people-centred company. 'It's a business with a very open and inclusive vision, great product choice and wide customer appeal, supported at all levels by a highly motivated and knowledgeable workforce,' says Anshu Srivastava, managing director of MRA. 'We looked at brand communications to see how schuh already represents itself, for example PR campaigns, website and social media channels.'

The new motif is incorporated into the high-level wayfinding inside the store
The new motif is incorporated into the high-level wayfinding inside the store

MRA used its research to translate the company's zeitgeist into an interior design that represents the brand in 2015. Additionally to 'develop and deepen' its approach, the practice turned for inspiration to the work of contemporary artists Aakash Nihalani and Will Dorner, both of whom explore the relationship between public space and people in a way that is witty, uncomplicated, colourful and inclusive. 'Their artistic ideas happened to chime perfectly with the technological characteristics evident in schuh's impressive website and back office systems,' says Srivastava.

Inspired by these connections MRA has developed a shop-fit concept based on improved sightlines and simple modular forms. The scheme's use of bold colour helps to organise the customer's journey, with low-tech construction techniques and sustainable materials, such as birch-faced plywood and maple, making fixtures and units easy to use, simple to install and good value. And with the whole shop-fit now based on a specially developed kit-of-parts system, it is the new mid-floor units that particularly bring the concept of lightweight and modular construction to life and align to MRA's ambition of creating visual clarity through its design.

'We have been able to reduce the height of mid-floor units by making the perimeter system work harder - this increases visibility and helps the customers quickly orientate themselves on entering the store,' says MRA design director Stephanie Srivastava. All the units and furniture for the shop were custom designed by MRA.

MRA’s newly designed schuh motif features above the Bluewater store entrance
MRA's newly designed schuh motif features above the Bluewater store entrance

'The very essence of the construction creates forms which are low and three-dimensional, but this means that the display units are accessible from all sides and allied to our new LED lighting design, which allows the customer to more easily see, reach and pick up a particular style,' she says. Required by shuh to provide an all- LED lighting solution for the store, MRA designed a dramatic lighting scheme. Contrast and shadow was minimised by introducing a mix of flood and spotlights, enabling light to reach all the display products - even on lower shelves.

Digital kiosks are also placed throughout the store for product look-ups and sales. These interfaces have been designed to support the customer journey and integrate the new store aesthetic, as well as further enhancing the brand experience by making a seamless connection between the physical and online sides of the business.

Also charged with schuh's new motif development, MRA has provided a new store facade that debuts the retailer's new 'starburst' graphic, responding to schuh's brief of 'looking both backwards and forwards to arrive at an integrated vision'. MRA explored the geometry of schuh's classic, oval-shaped logo to devise a graphic of shooting tangential lines and overlapping tonal fields. The new dynamic reinterpretation is repeated as a unifying theme throughout the rest of the interior, such as the high-levelled wayfinding that wraps around the entire store to identify product zones.

Anshu Srivastava comments: 'We are delighted to have worked with schuh on the twentyFIFTEEN interior retail concept. The collaboration has been a fantastic experience, which has resulted in a store environment that successfully captures the innovative and customer-orientated values for which the client is renowned.'

Suppliers

Flooring
Focus ceramics

Lighting
encapsulite
philips

Furniture design
MRA Architecture & Interior Design

Furniture manufacture
WSG Interior Systems

 

Top girls’ school, Roedean, receives major refurbishment

FX


Project Info

Client: Roedean School

Architect: BuckleyGrayYeoman

Size: 6,040 sq m

Cost: Not disclosed

Duration: 14 months


Words by Emily Martin

Images by Hufton +Crow

Architecture practice BuckleyGray Yeoman has refurbished four Grade II listed boarding houses at Roedean, bringing the Victorian buildings firmly into the 21st century with a refurbishment that is both sensitive and tasteful.

For one of the world's leading independent girls' schools, on the UK's south coast in Sussex, the four Victorian Arts and Crafts boarding houses were designed by Sir John Simpson and built in 1898. Drawing inspiration on the surrounding natural beauty - a 45-acre coastal campus, which lies just outside Brighton and within the South Downs National Park - the practice was also keen on the idea of 'home', using its project experience on private residences and boutique hotel spaces in the refurbishment. Each house has 33 bedrooms for 39 boarders and a wide range of communal areas - including prep rooms, dining rooms, bathrooms, drawing rooms and hobby rooms.

BuckleyGrayYeoman visually reduced ceiling heights through using a darker paint and pendant lights
BuckleyGrayYeoman visually reduced ceiling heights through using a darker paint and pendant lights

'The girls who live at Roedean often won't see their parents for months at a time - some spend nine months without going home - so we wanted them to feel like they were living in an English country house, a true home from home,' says Laura O'Hagan, associate director of BuckleyGrayYeoman. 'The new interiors reflect the beauty of the landscape, the architectural heritage of the 1898 Arts and Crafts buildings and the school's reputation for combining tradition with a progressive and forward-thinking approach to education.'

A one-bed study room, with a neutral colour palette and colour splashes
A one-bed study room, with a neutral colour palette and colour splashes

BuckleyGrayYeoman's designs enhanced the internal layout of the buildings and new areas for interactive learning, private study, and socialising have been created. The houses are central to the Roedean ethos of ensuring every student is a member of a house and has access to the common areas - whether a boarder or not. 'Each boarding house has an Old Dining Room that we have turned into the "heart of the home" - a place where the whole house can congregate in comfort,' explains O'Hagan. 'The major move was to give the space purpose by bringing the kitchen into the middle of the space, just like in a modern home.'

BuckleyGrayYeoman has reduced the scale of the room by introducing a dark colour to the ceiling and top section of the wall, teaming them with pendant lights to provide a more domestic character. Colour palettes of blue, red, green and yellow are also played out in the fabrics, and carpet designs identify each house. 'We reinforced the "Englishness" by specifying largely English manufacturers and products,' says O'Hagan using British design brands including Ercol, James Burleigh and Innermost. Each house also features William Morris wallpapers, bespoke and handmade rugs and carpets, and light-hearted details - such as plywood deer heads.

English country-house styling in the lounge, with original Arts and Crafts features
English country-house styling in the lounge, with original Arts and Crafts features

Artworks by past students hang throughout the common areas, providing a personal touch and giving a presence to the 'Old Roedeanians'. The contemporary design aesthetic creates lively and comfortable spaces that also make the most of the school's rich heritage and the wonderful original detailing of the buildings. Key to the refurbishment was the transformation of the student bedrooms, which are mostly one or two-beds with a small number of three-bed rooms.

'We spent a long time thinking about how the rooms will be used and this informed the design of bespoke furniture and fittings to maximise the available space, creating warm, welcoming and well-organised rooms suitable for sleeping and private study,' explains O'Hagan. 'The bespoke furniture system integrates lighting fixtures and frames the windows and sea views beyond.' The rooms feature a neutral colour palette with highlights of blue, red, green or yellow.

A fresh look for the houses’ refurbished showers
A fresh look for the houses' refurbished showers

In addition to its work on the interior design, BuckleyGrayYeoman comprehensively overhauled the houses' electrical, plumbing and heating services. Energy-saving improvements such as new windows and insulation were installed as part of the refurbishment, within the constraints of listed building regulations.

'The refurbishment of the boarding houses at Roedean is a fantastic project and one that underlines the value of working across the disciplines to keep ahead in architecture,' says Paul White, director of BuckleyGrayYeoman.

'The new interiors reflect the school's reputation for combining tradition with a progressive and forward-thinking approach to education, and are of the highest quality to be found in the UK.'

Suppliers

Furniture
James Burleigh
Morgan Furniture
Ercol
Modus
Ton
Swedese
Lyndon Design
Koleksion
Boss
Bisley


Rugs / carpet
Kappa Lamda
Ulster Carpets

Lighting
Original BTC Lighting
Innermost

Wallcovering
William Morris

 

Tasting Rooms, Greenwich Studio

FX


Project Info

Designer: Studio 48 London

Size: 836 sq m

Cost: Not disclosed

Duration: 24 weeks


Words by Emily Martin

Images by Michael Franke

London-based craft-brewer Meantime Brewing has opened the doors on the Tasting Rooms: a new multipurpose venue that offers the chance to tour, drink and shop in the company's main brewery in Greenwich.

Studio 48 London created Meantime's 'modern craft-beer' experience, which converted an 836 sq m space, adjacent to the existing brewery, to provide a 100-person capacity bar and retail space against a dramatic backdrop of giant maturation tanks. Delivering a scheme that bridges the gap between consumer and brewing process, creative strategist at Studio 48 London Gabriel Murray says it has been a 'fascinating challenge' for the studio to integrate brewing, tasting, shopping, drinking and eating - and has done so by providing the brewery's new retail space.

Brewing tanks are made a feature in the bar area of the space
Brewing tanks are made a feature in the bar area of the space

The shop immerses consumers in Meantime's modern craft-brewery experience, which is also the arrival space to the brewery and doubles as the visitor centre. Visitors to the brewery are greeted by a central, circular, aluminium table furnished with stools and iPads, and flanked with bespoke units carrying Meantime merchandise and lifestyle apparel.

As well as the magnificent backdrop of the brewery, complete with the new 80,000ltr maturation tanks and a 21st-century kegging robot, all viewable from the retail area, an impressive cold store is sited towards the rear of the shop, allowing visitors to buy chilled beer to enjoy later at home. 'The cold store is an American concept and has really taken off in the USA among the craft brewers there,' says Murray, who was keen to use the concept for Meantime. 'It uses a wall refrigeration system, but we had to adapt under-counter refrigeration units as wall refrigeration is not available in the UK.'

From Urban Cottage, metal cages sit over a ‘classic’ bulb to add to the industrial vibe of the space
From Urban Cottage, metal cages sit over a 'classic' bulb to add to the industrial vibe of the space

Founded by Murray in 2003, Studio 48 London has completed a wide range of hotels, restaurants and retail spaces for brands on a global scale across its core disciplines of branding, interiors and architecture. 'This is the first time we have taken on a brewery project,' says Murray who, when living in the USA and working for FITCH, recalls the popularity of microbrewers and craft beer in that country. His experience in retail design, coupled with time spent in the USA, has inspired key features within the scheme.

Murray adds that it was important to create a destination, which is reflected by the interior design, by providing an inclusive experience that appeals to a wide range of craft-beer fans. 'The scheme is a warm, soft and all embracing one and we were careful not to create a masculine feel, as breweries can be male dominated,' he says. The scheme also features a distressed effect oak (as seen in the retail units) to help maintain the brewery's industrial feel.

The new retail space at the Meantime brewery
The new retail space at the Meantime brewery

For the Tasting Room itself, Studio 48 opted for a bar design approach and features 'Brewery Fresh' tanks built into the bar. The tanks are unique storage and dispensing systems that protect the beer from light, oxygen and fluctuations in temperature, allowing the beer to continually mature, which means consumers can enjoy a straight-from-the-brewery taste.

'The bar had to be built around the tanks, once they were in place,' says Murray of the cladded-oak construction with glass fronts to showcase the tanks. 'The size of the tanks dictated the bar size, which gave us some challenges when fitting the bar and making sure it was a workable space.'

Distressed oak frames glass-fronted brewing tanks in the bar
Distressed oak frames glass-fronted brewing tanks in the bar

Another challenge faced by Studio 48 was the low height of the ceiling in the bar area, meaning that lighting the space was difficult. Opting for a 'classic' light bulb, with a metal cage around each one, aligned with an industrial feel as well as creating what Murray calls an 'interesting shadow on the ceiling'.

Meantime is using the new space to also put on beer-and-food matching events, tutored tastings and as a restaurant area for year-round use. The brewery's initiative of 'immersing consumers and trade firsthand into the craft brewing process, while demonstrating the wide range of tastes that beer can deliver' is at the forefront of Studio 48's design scheme.

It has in return made the Tasting Rooms and shop a reflection of Meantime's dedication to British brewing and is changing the way people think about beer.

Suppliers

Furniture
Design Resource Interiors

Flooring
Kemtile

Lighting
Urban Cottage
Trainspotters

 

Park House by A-cero Joaquin Torres and Rafael Llamazares architects

How were you commissioned?:
The owners of the plot liked the A-cero architecture so they didn't hesitate to hire us for their home's project.

Park House

 

What was the brief from the client and how much were they involved?:
They looked for straight orthogonal forms but without compromising on modern architecture. Housing continues parameters of high quality of finishes and a restrained concept.

Park House

How did the brief affect the materials and design choices?:
The entire project proposed high quality materials. Limestone is placed on the facade and inside the floors are stone on the ground floor and wood on the top floor.

Park House Kitchen

How did your previous experience help you with this project?:
Experience is obviously an important factor and A-cero have produced Architecture projects worldwide and although they work on many different types of projects, detached houses are characteristic of the work A-cero has carried out for 20 years.

Park House Spiral Staircase

Can you explain the layout of the project:
A-cero presents one of its latest projects for a detached family house. It is a residence of 1250 sqm built on a plot of 1,700 sqm. Access from the street is via an entrance for vehicles and people. The whole plot is enclosed with a fence designed by A-cero made in the stone itself housing and black galvanized steel. The plot has a landscaped garden noted for its practicality and consistency with the architecture of the house. The facade is made of limestone and black glass. In this case, Joaquín Torres and Rafael Llamazares project a more orthogonal design following the clients preferences, although with the essence of A-cero style. The large entrance door of the house has a exclusive design in black glass and steel. Once inside there is a huge hall with double height space, abundant luminosity, simplicity and an imposing spiral staircase in white and glass that along with an elevator connects the three floors of the house. This floor has the main living areas - a large living room, cinema room, office, dining room, kitchen with pantry and toilet. Both the living-room and the kitchen connect with outside, with a porch and pool area through large sliding windows. The top floor has the bedrooms and childrens playroom.

Park House

There are five bedroom suites with their own bathrooms, a playroom for children and a large master bedroom with separate dressing rooms and a spacious bathroom. The interior of the house also has a high standard quality finish, with stone or wood floors and lacquered paint on the walls. In general the decoration throughout the house is minimalist while still being stylish and interesting. Only the children's areas have more colour but also keeping a certain sobriety. In the basement there is an indoor pool, sauna, gym, service area, garage and facilities. The whole house is equipped with advanced automation solutions.

Park House

What problems or challenges did you face?:
Due to a close relationship with the customers from the beginning it was an easy project.

Park House

What do you feel were the most unusual design elements of the project?:
In A-cero we are very used to creating houses with unusual elements such as indoor pool, a movie theater, a gym, disco and even an indoor shooting range ... For some time now we don't question any client request because what may seem strange to you, may be necessary in the client `modus vivendi´

Park House

How do you think this project is pushing design forward? What makes it special?:
I think it is a very coherent project - both the exterior and the interior. Very consistent with owners wishes.

Park House

Suppliers Please provide details of product names and suppliers where possible.:
Photographer: Roi Alonso

 

New ROCKFON Monolithic ceiling adds sound styling and sophistication

Situated on the south bank of the River Thames in the former Sea Containers' HQ, this luxurious hotel was designed with the creative direction of renowned British designer Tom Dixon by the Design Research Studio. Inspired by 1920s cruise ship glamour, the interior captures the essence of the original building and offers style and sophistication for which the Mondrian brand is known.

The restaurant and bar are two of the most glamorous areas of the hotel. Mondrian wanted a ceiling system that can provide the necessary acoustic control for these busy places whilst complementing the character of the architecture and Art Deco interior. ROCKFON Mono® Acoustic brings together the seamless, clean lines associated with traditional plastered surfaces, with performance characteristics thought only possible with modular suspended ceiling and wall systems.

Rockfon Monolithic Ceiling

Mondrian Director of Sales and Marketing, Simon Gilkes is delighted with the finished results: "It's been a pleasure to work with ROCKFON. They've addressed the acoustic requirements of such voluminous spaces throughout Mondrian London. Their knowledge, professionalism and considered approach to the iconic Sea Containers' building was a success from both a design and acoustic perspective."

The hotel's interior features many hard surfaces including a copper clad wall in the reception area and a glass cube in the bar. These areas have the potential to be very noisy, but the monolithic ceiling provides Class A sound absorption (0.90aw) which significantly decreases echo and reverberation levels, creating a relaxed environment where guests can hear their conversations.

PANARC Interior Solutions, an authorised ROCKFON Mono installer, carried out the installation of the Mono® Acoustic ceilings. PANARC Business Development Manager, Daniel Davies explains why they were the perfect solution: "Installation was complex because of the various restrictions posed by this listed building. The versatility and flexibility of Mono® Acoustic helped us meet these challenges and create the seamless finish the hotel desired."

Rockfon ceiling

ROCKFON Mono Acoustic ceiling is suitable for refurbishment projects or new builds. The tiles are installed using a Chicago Metallic suspension system or can be directly mounted on existing ceilings and walls. They can fit in large spaces or smaller rooms as seamless spans, ceiling islands and walls. The improved render creates a smoother, white, monolithic surface.

The ceiling allows for easy incorporation of lighting, air conditioning and ventilation systems and offers Class A2 fire protection. The tiles are dimensionally stable at up to 100% relative humidity and can be installed in temperatures ranging from 0°C to 40°C, allowing for installation to take place before windows are fully sealed.

ROCKFON are happy to use their expertise and technical knowledge to help you create robust and beautiful ceilings. For information on samples, specifications, advice on your project or to find your nearest area sales manager, visit www.rockfon.co.uk or call the hotline number 0800 389 0314.

 

SculptureCenter Renovation and Expansion

How were you commissioned?

We were commissioned by the New York City Department of Design and Construction.

Expansion and Renovation

What was the brief from the client and how much were they involved?

The initial project brief asked for a fire stair - a second means of egress for the basement level "catacombs" of the original 1907 structure. The building was built originally for the repair of trolley engines. In 2001 Maya Lin designed a renovation of the ground floor space of the original building, but funds did not permit the upgrade of the basement, or inclusion of much of what was needed by the SculptureCenter. After assessing the request for a fire stair, we initiated a discussion with the SculptureCenter to better understand their larger goals and ambitions. The intent was to have this stair sync into future planning requirements. As the discussion evolved, it was determined that the SculptureCenter needed a proper entry and reception space, and a better way to enter and move through their gallery space. The firestair, and an elevator, were just components of their larger needs.

Entry Gallery and Reception

How did the brief affect the materials and design choices?

As we discussed, and tested design ideas, we were able to develop an efficient strategy for providing a new addition that would both add program space and transform the use of the existing building without dramatically changing the building itself. Introduction of natural light and use of robust materials that speak to the existing building and industrial neighborhood were used to extend the distinct atmosphere of SculptureCenter.

Corten Facade Detail

How did your previous experience help you with this project?

The work of the studio capitalizes on the qualities of place and seeks opportunities in the desires and programmatic requirements of each of our clients. Informed by working within the constraints of the dense urban fabric of New York City, we utilize an economy of means to create dignified and spatially rich architecture. Natural light, carefully chosen views, and appropriate materials are the mediums through which we engage our work with its context and place. We have designed a range of project types for an equally wide range of clients; public, institutional, and private. Our interests and experiences allow us to approach each project on its own unique terms through an intense engagement with user and site, while drawing on our varied experiences in design and construction.

Entry between two facades

Can you explain the layout of the project

We designed a new entry building for ticketing and orientation, a bookshop, elevator and stairs, and interior and exterior exhibit spaces. This structure serves as the nexus between arrival and the galleries. New space for exhibiting work was formed by bounding exterior space between the new and existing buildings. The galleries in the vault spaces under the main hall were renovated to become accessible exhibition spaces.

New and Old

What problems or challenges did you face?

Our design thinking came out of a close reading of the site and existing building. A series of sixteen-foot high Cor-Ten steel panels form the façade of the new building, asserting the building's presence on Purves Street, and addressing the SculptureCenter's long time need for a better and more public entrance to the galleries. Behind this facade, a new entry court and entryway join the new building and the existing structure. The new building contains an entry lobby, a ticketing area, a bookshop, a coatroom, restroom facilities, and various gallery spaces. In addition to increasing the SculptureCenter's programming space by twenty-five percent, the new structure also provides ADA access via a new elevator and new egress stairs. These modifications enable the cellar-level vault spaces to be used as gallery space. A 1,500 square foot courtyard also provides SculptureCenter an outdoor exhibition and event space.

Vaulted Gallery

What do you feel were the most unusual design elements of the project?

The most unusual design elements of the project would be the choice of materials. The Cor-Ten steel panels that form the facade of the new building, the contrast of the white walls and black steel of the new building against the rough and industrial surfaces of the existing space

View to sculpture court

How do you think this project is pushing design forward? What makes it special?

The new entry sequence allows for arrival, orientation, and a slow, curated revealing of the art, culminating in the spaces of the original building. In this manner, the full potential of the adaptive re-use of an old industrial structure is allowed by the nuanced and calibrated interventions and support spaces of the new building.

Entry View

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ArmourFX ‘Timber-Effect’ Panels used for HomeAway Inc

ArmourFX Timber-Effect panels are designed for decorative wall cladding, making them ideal for interior theming and branding. Two designs are available ('original' and 'rugged'), both created from actual Douglas Fir timber planks. The 'rugged' finish is achieved from further hand-distressing of the timber. Cast in a polymer-modified gypsum resin mix, the panels are available in four base colours in both smooth and textured finishes, the smooth panels can be enhanced once installed with EcoPearl waxes to create a further 16 colours.

ArmourFX ‘Timber-Effect’ Panels used for HomeAway Inc

Commenting on the project Raul Baeza, Designer at lauckgroup, said: "We had used the product previously on a smaller scale and loved the textural dimension it added. When we began design on HomeAway Domain, the client requested a memorable and monumental star. Immediately, we knew we wanted to use the Timber-Effect Planking as the feature backdrop to the stair and reception area. The product was on point with the desired price and created the perfect monolithic aesthetic we were looking for while having visual interest with the wood grain imprint."

ArmourFX ‘Timber-Effect’ Panels used for HomeAway Inc

The panels offer tremendous design options, often replacing exotic or expensive timber for commercial projects. ArmourFX Timber-Effect panels have also been used to replace or match Shou-Sugi-Ban Japanese charred planks or Mountain Pine Beetle blue-stain timber.

The ArmourFX range of panels has evolved from Armourcoat's renowned range of applied seamless wall finishes. ArmourFX includes finishes and substrates suitable for all applications; from retail to residential, hotel to healthcare. Armourcoat's specialist designers and artisan plasterers can create integrated custom wall panel systems or design statement single artwork pieces.

 



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Architect Mahmood Fallahian

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