japanese tea bar tsujiri in london designed by mimstudios


detail and intricacy come through the materiality of soft surfaces as in the grains of the timber ceiling and stone countertop.

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It Just Got a Lot Easier to Connect Health Data to Other Data

A map showing census tract percentages of households where 30 percent or more of household income is spent on housing costs, from the new City Health Dashboard. (Credit: City Health Dashboard)

When you think about the most pressing problems in urban America, the word multifaceted comes to mind. To break the cycle of intergenerational poverty, we need to be looking at education. To improve education, we need to look at zero-tolerance policing. And so on.

That’s especially true when it comes to health. The contributing factors are complex. Finding novel interventions to intractable problems like obesity and opioid overdoses, for example, require looking at data from a variety of areas both within and outside of healthcare fields. But these numbers exist in disparate data sets, often compiled by different organizations, with different methods — so they tend not to be so easy to manipulate.

Enter a new tool for policymakers, researchers, and civic leaders to explore these connections in one place, the City Health Dashboard. Launched by the Department of Population Health at NYU School of Medicine last week, the database presents an easy-to-navigate alternative to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder that brings together city-level and neighborhood-level numbers related to not only health but also its upstream and downstream factors — such as employment, housing and chronic absenteeism from school.

“It’s not a site that’s only about health or healthcare. It takes a broader view of what is health all about — what really produces health in our society?” says Dr. Marc Gourevitch, chair of the Department of Population Health at NYU and the lead researcher on the project. “We’re bringing together data not just about health but about what drives health, in one place, so that coherent conversations can be had in setting priorities and thinking about what we can do to improve population health and health equity.”

The interface was designed to make connections across the raw information hidden in its data, which includes a wide array of datasets pulled from the Centers for Disease Control, the Census Bureau, and other sources, covering the 500 largest American cities.

The dashboard began as a pilot project in 2017 involving four partner cities: Providence, R.I.; Waco, Texas; Kansas City, Kan.; and Flint, Mich. The team quickly realized that more peer comparisons were needed in order to best inform the public health experts, urban policy scholars, and lawmakers they intended to be the primary audience.

“The idea for the dashboard came about from a recognition that most health data in the U.S. turned out to be organized at the county or state level. City leaders and community leaders lacked the granular data about health and its determinants at the level that they are responsible for or living in,” says Gourevitch.

Working with colleagues at NYU’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the National Resource Network, which works with economically distressed cities, the City Health Dashboard team heard from a lot of the mayors and city managers who expressed interest in health as one of their top agenda items, but it wasn’t, essentially, because they were lacking data to manage against.

Often, it’s not a void of data that impedes public health progress as much as it’s a lack of standardization and organization. That’s why the City Health Dashboard team put a premium on careful data choices and thoughtful design. An advisory committee — comprising leaders in public health, elected officials, and researchers across the country — gave input on the project along the way.

The City Health Dashboard also produces custom scatter plots, like this one showing the relationship between frequent mental distress and households spending 30 percent or more of their income on housing. Each dot represents a census tract in Philadelphia. (Credit: City Health Dashboard)

Along with NYU, partners on the project include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (the primary funder), the National League of Cities, the National Resource Network, and the International City/County Management Association.

“We were involved with making sure that this is a resource that’s usable for local governments and is designed for them,” says Andrea Fox, deputy director of global programs at the International City/County Management Association.

The finished product, Fox says, encourages the complex connections that cities increasingly need to make in order to achieve positive outcomes across sectors. In some of the efforts Fox says the association has been involved with in terms of sustainability planning, the topic of access to dental care has come up a lot — not necessarily a traditional sustainability measure. “But it’s related to health, which is related to sustainability. People need to find new connections through data,” says Fox.

That’s why “[the dashboard] is a powerful tool,” Fox says. “[Local government] may go in there looking for information on opioid overdose and may come out looking at dental records.”

 

Milwaukee’s Workforce Shortage is Really a Transit Shortage

(AP Photo/Morry Gash)

This past winter, Wisconsin launched a widely criticized million-dollar advertising campaign to lure Chicago millennials to the state, ostensibly to fill a workforce gap. On the surface, it made sense — the statewide unemployment rate is at a record low, 2.9 percent, the working-age population growth is only projected to be 0.2 percent, while the projected job growth rate is six percent. State officials believe they need to attract new talent.

But dig a little deeper, and you find that there are plenty of workers in Wisconsin who still need jobs, but they can’t get to where the state’s new jobs are increasingly located.

Only 44 percent of Milwaukee’s black men are employed, according to Univesity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Center for Economic Development. The problem for those workers, say regional workforce development providers, is that all the economic development in the region is in the suburbs, while the state has no regional transportation system connecting those jobs to where those workers live.

The recent headline deal for Taiwanese LCD screen manufacturer Foxconn is emblematic of the disconnect. The state provided $4 billion in incentives for the company to open a plant in the Milwaukee region, promising 13,000 jobs. But the plant is located in Racine County, south of Milwaukee, while most of the region’s black population is concentrated in the northern half of Milwaukee — a legacy of redlining and other discriminatory practices that made it the only part of the region that welcomed black families.

The company never considered moving into an existing unused industrial corridor that flanks the city’s poorest neighborhoods, where “tens of thousands of workers with manufacturing skills,” live, according to State Representative David Bowen, whose district includes the Milwaukee neighborhoods with the highest jobless rates.

Employers argue workers in those neighborhoods lack the necessary skills to take on modern factory jobs, using advanced technology to manufacture screens for smartphones and other modern-day products. But federally-funded workforce development agencies have spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the region, including $386 million in 2017, according to the Public Policy Forum, a research organization based in Milwaukee. Around one million Wisconsinites participated in those workforce development programs in 2017, and according to a study by Public Policy Forum, adult alumni of those training programs are concentrated in the northern half of Milwaukee.

“What we’re doing is making the connection between what employers need and the people who come in looking for job training,” says Scott Jansen, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Employ Milwaukee, one of the largest workforce training contractors in the state.

Transit, on the other hand, is a real barrier. In a survey of participants in one workforce development program, the Public Policy Forum found that nearly half of all adult program participants did not have a driver’s license.

Bowen says transportation was not part of the FoxConn discussions. Giving $4 billion to a private company to create jobs without funding for people to get to those jobs was a missed opportunity, says Bowen.

“Companies aren’t locating [inside Milwaukee],” says Dorothy Walker, interim dean of the Milwaukee Area Technical College’s Applied Sciences Division.

Once the Foxconn deal was signed, says Walker, the state turned to the area technical colleges and asked what they were going to do to provide workers. The presidents of three technical colleges in the region collaborated to provide students with the programs they need, regardless of where they live. The tech colleges looped in two local universities with engineering programs to make sure that the students’ credits would be accepted as transfers. Still, transit has proven to be a barrier.

“If they would invest in the transportation system, [the workers] could at least get out to the jobs,” says Walker.

It took a lawsuit to make the state put some dollars into regional public transit options. In 2014, Milwaukee’s Black Health Coalition and Milwaukee Interfaith Congregations Allied for Hope sued the state of Wisconsin over a $418 million highway expansion project, that, they argued, exclusively benefited suburbanites. With a $13.5 million settlement from the lawsuit, the two organizations established two viable bus routes that now transport over a thousand people a day to their jobs in the suburbs.

In December, the state will reach the end of its four-year settlement commitment and will stop subsidizing the two lines, potentially leaving those workers with no way to get to the jobs that they already have.

Meanwhile, the state just approved $6.8 million to expand the campaign to attract millennials from other Midwest states.

 

TH_NK – London Office

Ward Robinson design and project manage the redesign and fit-out of TH_NK – London Office.
 

partridge proves timing is everything with the yamaha MT-10 build for TW steel


 made in collaboration with watch manufacturer TW steel the motorcycle builds on the factory specs of the naked sports bike, wanting to offer something much wilder.

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urban agency’s rustic house is sheds covered with rusted metal


the project comprises three buildings each corresponding to a particular use.

The post urban agency’s rustic house is sheds covered with rusted metal appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

the royal wedding 2018: six design moments you may have missed


a tradition-breaking cake, that 'yellow dress', and only one wedding ring!?

The post the royal wedding 2018: six design moments you may have missed appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

kosuke araki turns daily food waste into collection of tableware and vessels


the japanese designer's 'anima' and 'food waste ware' collections aim to make users reflect on daily consumption patterns.

The post kosuke araki turns daily food waste into collection of tableware and vessels appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

 

Century of the Child: Nordic Design for Children 1900 to Today — review

The V&A Museum of Childhood’s survey of Nordic design for children since 1900 explores how Scandinavian designers have used play and wonder to put children at the heart of the design of homes, cities and communities
 

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

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Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

Huge thanks to Lesley for flagging up this 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland. But you will have to move quickly to secure it. Also thanks to Lesley for giving me some much-needed background on the place.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

I now know that this one dates back to 1968, the work of local architect Archie Ferguson and described in Buildings of Scotland as being ‘tucked against the hillside looking south’, adding that ‘the crisp geometry…intrudes without compromise’. Oh yes, it was also built by the architect for his own use.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

However, time hasn’t been as kind as it could be. The house is now being sold following Archie Ferguson’s death and although I can’t judge its state structurally (Stirling is a bit of a jaunt), the inside looks to be a bit of a mess right now.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. A close look suggests the mess is really just possessions and beyond all of that, so much of the original design is still in place. In fact, I would go as far as to suggest that the house is pretty much untouched.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

So the beams, the wood panelling, the flooring. the doors, the light fittings, the kitchen units, the staircase and more all survive and presumably could be refurbished and featured prominently in a makeover.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

However, the house isn’t being marketed as a renovation, this is a ‘development opportunity’ and ‘subject to the necessary planning permissions and consents be replaced with a bespoke family home’.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

Basically the plot is for sale, not the house. Although I see no reason why the house shouldn’t live on. Although obviously you would need to view and assess yourself. There could be a reason why it is being sold as a plot (a fifth of an acre if you are interested), after all.

Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland
Renovation project: 1960s midcentury time capsule in Stirling, Scotland

In its current state, the house is laid out with an entrance hall, a lounge with that wall of glazing, a second lounge, dining room, office and kitchen. There are also four bedrooms, a utility room, a wet room, WC and storage areas within. I’m not sure how flexible that space is. Again, a viewing should explain it.

Now the tricky bit, buying it. The deadline was officially yesterday, although I have been told that it might actually be next Friday. So possibly still time to make a move if you want to.

As for the price, it is offers over £300,000.

Images and details courtesy of Clyde Property. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

You can check out some more renovation projects here.

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