dimorestudio’s sophisticated mix between market and showroom for excelsior milano


the new interiors have been developed as a stylistic evolution of the existing structure designed in 2011 by jean nouvel.

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junya ishigami creates 12-meter cantilevered display shelves for JINS eyewear store


from one side three cantilevered shelves and two shorter shelves for customer assistance protrude, casting equally elongated shadows directly underneath.

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DWF designs a safe and affordable solution for wind generation


due to the possibility of flexible adjustment of parameters of the generator, it can work with high efficiency in a wide range of winds.

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The Hidden Powers of Composting in Baltimore City

Composting units at the Filbert Street Community Garden in Baltimore. (Credit: Filbert Street Community Garden)

Marvin Hayes tells a story about a time he was clinging to a tree for dear life, twenty feet above the ground during a ropes course at Outward Bound.

“I was terrified from heights. A young guy from Baltimore City, from Sandtown-Winchester. Never had really been out camping or rock anything like that,” says Hayes.

Hayes made it halfway but couldn’t get beyond that. So, he says, after about two hours, people helped him get down. The experience stuck with him though, and he made a deal with his school counselor that if he passed all his classes, the school would send him back to try the course again.

“That course turned into about five courses. I wind up getting an internship with Outward Bound, being a counselor,” Hayes recalls. He’s been working with youth ever since. In his latest endeavor, he’s been working with youth for the past year as part of the Baltimore Compost Collective to turn food scraps into “black gold” — compost.

“What’s so special about our program is an opportunity to work with youth to transform them and give them a skill,” says Hayes, who runs the compost collective and is the youth supervisor.

The Baltimore Compost Collective works by gathering food scraps from residences in Baltimore’s Curtis Bay, Federal Hill, Riverside Park, and Locust Point neighborhoods and composts the material at the Filbert Street Community Garden in Curtis Bay. It employs local teenagers and trains them in workforce skills, food access programming and community-scale composting. The compost they create gets used by the Filbert Street Community Garden to grow fresh produce. The collective was modeled on BK ROT, a Brooklyn, N.Y.-based composting service.

The Baltimore Compost Collective developed as a partnership between United Workers, a local community development and worker justice organization, and the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR), a national nonprofit organization that provides research and technical assistance.

“Our mission, essentially, is promoting a homegrown economy,” says Brenda Platt, ILSR’s co-director.

The group’s website says that it aims to keep political and economic power “as close to the people as possible, and ensuring that communities have the responsibility and authority to make the decisions that impact their lives.”

“In our ‘Composting for Community’ initiative,” Platt says, “our lens is how can we keep these community assets — food scraps, yard debris — circulating in the local economy?”

Often, Platt says, cities create infrastructure to remove compostable materials from the communities that generate them, transporting them to a large, centralized facility someplace far away. ILSR advocates a decentralized approach.

“We’re one of the only national groups really promoting a distributed infrastructure for food-waste recovery that supports community,” Platt says. As a result, the group has been advocating at the statewide policy level for solutions that can develop infrastructure to accommodate the local collection of organic waste such as food scraps.

The group also created a hierarchy diagram that aims to help people recognize what waste can be captured and re-used locally while building community. For example, human food scraps can be used to feed backyard chickens or composted for use in a garden.

The compost collective’s work has turned out to be particularly prescient. In early September, Baltimore was selected as one of two national pilot cities for a food waste reduction project launched by the National Resources Defense Council and the Rockefeller Foundation. The United States wastes an estimated 40 percent of its food each year; under the new project, the Baltimore pilot food waste reduction initiative aims to reduce commercial food waste by half while decreasing residential waste 80 percent by 2040.

The Baltimore Compost Collective work offers a tested model to help achieve that goal in Baltimore while also making progress on other fronts. Composting can enrich soil for food, and, according to ISLR, it can also reduce the pollutants in stormwater by 60-95 percent — an important consideration in Baltimore where storm runoff flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Not to mention the work opportunity, skills growth for youth and face time with mentors like Hayes.

Anthony Walton, 19, is one of the youth working with Hayes. The two met when Walton was 14, but he soon moved with his father to California. When he returned to Baltimore, he got into trouble and was sentenced to community service. He called Hayes, who shared the phone number for the executive director of the community organization where the two had met a few years earlier.

“A lot of people don’t get a second chance at all, so I knew I needed to take advantage of that,” Walton says.

Anthony Walton (front, center) and Marvin Hayes (rear, right) and other community members representing the Baltimore Composting Collective at a September 2018 event announcing the city's new food waste management initiative. (Credit: Institute for Local Self-Reliance)

Before he started with the Baltimore Compost Collective, Walton says he knew nothing about composting.

“I love to learn things, and I’m a very hands-on person, so I thought it’d be something I’d like to do,” he says.

The work, Walton says, has transformed him. “It’s crazy how Mr. Hayes always says ‘We don’t just save food, we save youth’, and that’s in a way what he did with me,” Walton says.

Walton says that chopping up materials for composting helps him to calm himself. “It’s changed the way I eat, too,” he adds. “I think of it as, ‘if it’s not compostable, why should I put it in my body?’”

“Composting has been very good to me,” says Walton, who now lives in a 2-bedroom house that he shares with his girlfriend and step-daughter.

Hayes aims for the program to impact many more people.

“These small-scale food scraps can turn into a large-scale operation and not only save the food scraps from going into the incinerators and to the landfills, but it can create opportunities for youth, for ex-offenders,” says Hayes. “It can create opportunities for anybody who wants to learn a skill with composting, agriculture and lead Baltimore, ultimately, towards zero waste.”

 

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

WowHaus
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

This 1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent really is all about the wonderfully preserved interior.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

Not that it was intended as an art deco property. The architecture itself is described as being in the style of an ‘Italianate seaside villa’ and was one of the first houses to be constructed in the bay.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

However, South Foreland House was remodelled in the 1920s as a result of the area becoming fashionable with the ‘London artistic set’. At that time it was reworked in more of an art deco style, with much of that detail still evident.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

Of course, the exterior still has more of a classical look and the outlook, which offers those Channel views, is also unchanged. The selling point here is found beyond the front door.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

Much of the detail of the 1920s is still in place and lovingly maintained. Opulent and very much of the era, this is a step back in time to the roaring ‘20s.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

Some of it is understated period charm, like the living room for example. But things get turned up a notch in the hallway and the dining room and hit their peak when it comes to the bathroom. You will have to look hard to find a bathroom quite as glamorous as this one. Not quite a time capsule, but it would be so easy to lose yourself in the past in this place.

Fancy that? Well, let’s look at the house in more detail.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

From the drive, wide steps lead up to a raised terrace and the front door, taking in the lovely wrought ironwork on the door showing a galleon in full sail with accompanying stylised sea creatures on the side windows.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

The hallway definitely prepares you for what’s to come. The agent describes it as ‘understated elegance’ with trompe l’oeil block work and a sweeping staircase with an unusual velvet hand rail. The original turquoise paintwork is also still present on the round-headed door cases.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

To the left of the hall is the drawing room with original panelling and a door onto the terrace, as well as an open fireplace with an inset chinoiserie panel matches the original ceiling lamp and silk shades. The dining room is to the right of the hall, complete with walnut panelling to nearly full height and a large painted panel. The kitchen is also on this floor and another part panelled room with ‘an intriguing fireplace’, including a stone marquetry mountain vista.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

Head up that staircase past the stained glass window to the first floor and the main bedroom with fitted wardrobes and a dressing table with an ornate mirrored surround and the en-suite bathroom, described as ‘the jewel in the crown of this house’.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

That bathroom is detailed in mosaic tiling, while a recessed alcove houses an ornate bath with backlit glazed panels depicting ‘stylised sea life’ and an ornate ‘fish head tap’. To either side of the bath are alcoves for the shower and WC. Two further bedrooms and a bathroom complete the first floor layout.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

There is also a large lower ground floor featuring a games room (formerly the ballroom) and the original kitchen and store rooms. According to the agent, this area has been ‘prepared for restoration’ with much of the plaster having been removed in readiness for further work.

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

The gardens have been landscaped as terraces with interlinking pathways. To the west of the house are steps leading up to the wide paved terrace and there is an integral garage and an adjoining single garage.

A fascinating place, but not cheap with a guide price of £1,500,000.

Images and details courtesy of Strutt and Parker. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

 

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent
1920s art deco-style house in St Margarets Bay near Dover, Kent

 

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human body parts emerge from ronit baranga’s hybrid ceramic tableware


the bizarre pieces combine traditional teapots, cups and saucers with human body parts such as fingers, open mouths, and tongues.

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endless urban dining oasis in beijing’s wangjing soho by maison h


the project creates a fine dining experience as a sparkling, endless journey of spatial discovery within the mundanity of everyday life. 

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Billi bring a unique refreshment experience to Gymshark

When deciding on the details for their contemporary new HQ, Katie Watkinson and her team was looking to provide an energy-efficient and sustainable hydration solution for the Gymshark staff that fit with the company’s values of excellence and innovat…
 

Civic gesture: Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art by Assemble

In its biggest architectural commission to date, Turner Prize-winning Assemble has sensitively transformed a complex of Victorian baths in Lewisham into an open, adaptable public gallery for Goldsmiths, University of London
 

world’s first floating farm houses cows in hurricane-resilient structure


the high-tech, multilevel facility will float in the water in rotterdam, located roughly 50 miles outside of amsterdam.

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